An Unsentimental Journey Through Cornwall (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1884 - Cornwall (England : County) - 144 pages
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Page 105 - As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kits — Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were going to St. Ives?
Page 85 - I will lay me down in peace, and take my rest : for it is thou, Lord, only, that makest me dwell in safety.
Page 89 - And here we go backwards and forwards, And here we go round, round, roundy.
Page 144 - Who reverenced his conscience as his king; Whose glory was, redressing human wrong; Who spake no slander, no, nor listened to it; Who loved one only and who clave to her...
Page 92 - Earth, take thine Earth, my Sin let Satan havet, The World my goods, my Soul my God who gavet ; For from these four, Earth, Satan, World, and God, My flesh, my sin, my goods, my soul, I had.
Page 129 - Table, who were to go everywhere, punishing vice and rescuing oppressed virtue, for the love of God and of some noble lady. He married Guinevere, daughter of King Leodegrance, who forsook him for the love of Sir Launcelot, his bravest knight and dearest friend. One by one, his best knights fell away into sin, and his nephew Mordred raised a rebellion, fought with him, and conquered him at Camelford. Seeing his end was near, Arthur...
Page 129 - Uther Pendragon, King of Britain, falling in love with Ygrayne, wife of the duke of Cornwall, besieged them in their twin castles of Tintagel and Terrabil, slew the husband, and the same day married the wife. Unto whom a boy was born, and by advice of the enchanter Merlin, carried away, from the sea-shore beneath Tintagel, and confided to a good knight, Sir Ector, to be brought up as his own son, and christened Arthur.
Page 65 - Que«n," barely recognisable, a feeling of thankfulness was the only sensation left us. Now, let ine not be supposed hard upon these village Orpheuses. They did their best, and for a working man to study music in any form is a good and desirable thing. But whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well. The great bane of provincial life is that people have so few opportunities of finding out when they do not do things well, and so little ambition to learn to do them tetter.
Page 129 - Guinivere, daughter of King Leodegrance, who forsook him for the love of Sir Launcelot, his bravest knight and dearest friend. One by one, his best knights fell away into sin, and his nephew Mordred raised a rebellion, fought with him, and conquered him at Camelford. Seeing his end was near, Arthur bade his last faithful knight, Sir Bedevere, carry him to the shore of a mere (supposed to be Dozmare...
Page 2 - ... as Mrs. Malaprop would say, it is that grandest, wildest, most dangerous coast, the coast of Cornwall. I had always wished to investigate Cornwall. This desire had existed ever since, at five years old, I made acquaintance with Jack the Giantkiller, and afterwards, at fifteen or so, fell in love with my life's one hero, King Arthur. Between these two illustrious Cornishmen, — equally mythical, practical folk would say — there exists more similarity than at first appeared. The aim of Vx>th...

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