Land of the Tiger: A Natural History of the Indian Subcontinent

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1997 - Nature - 288 pages
2 Reviews
The extraordinarily diverse Indian subcontinent covers a vast area extending from Pakistan in the west to Bangladesh in the east and stretching north to the Himalayan kingdoms of Bhutan and Nepal. Marked by dramatic extremes of climate and terrain, it is home to black bears, snow leopards, elephants, and flying lizards, and it is the only place in the world where both lions and tigers reside.
After a lifetime devoted to the study and conservation of the tiger, Valmik Thapar turns his attention to the plants and animals that share the tiger's domain. How have so many species survived on such a crowded continent, where twenty percent of the world's population exerts intense pressure on the environment? Thapar links the region's tremendous diversity to the reverence shown to nature by Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. But fifty years after India's independence, modern and urban values are seriously eroding the subcontinent's ecosystems.
Thapar's careful natural history is enriched by his personal anecdotes and musings on spirituality and culture. His own reverence for the wildlife and landscape he encounters and his brilliant photographs make this book an enthralling read, and it is also a moving argument for more vigilant nature conservation on the Indian subcontinent. The extraordinarily diverse Indian subcontinent covers a vast area extending from Pakistan in the west to Bangladesh in the east and stretching north to the Himalayan kingdoms of Bhutan and Nepal. Marked by dramatic extremes of climate and terrain, it is home to black bears, snow leopards, elephants, and flying lizards, and it is the only place in the world where both lions and tigers reside.
After a lifetime devoted to the study and conservation of the tiger, Valmik Thapar turns his attention to the plants and animals that share the tiger's domain. How have so many species survived on such a crowded continent, where twenty percent of the world's population exerts intense pressure on the environment? Thapar links the region's tremendous diversity to the reverence shown to nature by Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. But fifty years after India's independence, modern and urban values are seriously eroding the subcontinent's ecosystems.
Thapar's careful natural history is enriched by his personal anecdotes and musings on spirituality and culture. His own reverence for the wildlife and landscape he encounters and his brilliant photographs make this book an enthralling read, and it is also a moving argument for more vigilant nature conservation on the Indian subcontinent.
  

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An absorbing account of Wildlife in India, is a treat to nature lovers. The photographs and exhaustive details are par excellence. Shall we human being also not give them a chance to live on this planet?

Review: Land of the Tiger: A Natural History of the Indian Subcontinent

User Review  - Melanie - Goodreads

This is an engrossing introduction to the wildlife of the Indian Subcontinent. The vivid descriptions and photography in places made me feel like I was there. I wish there was more! Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Valmik Thapar is one of the world's leading tiger experts. Since 1972 he has dedicated his life to filming, recording, and photographing tigers in the wild and working for their preservation. He is the Executive Director of the Ranthambhore Foundation and author of several books on tigers, including The Tiger's Destiny (1992). Valmik Thapar is the presenter of the BBC television series Land of the Tiger.

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