The story of the Thirty eighth regiment of Massachusetts volunteers (Google eBook)

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1866
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Page 174 - Still sprung from those swift hoofs, thundering South, The dust, like smoke from the cannon's mouth, Or the trail of a comet, sweeping faster and faster, Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster; The heart of the steed and the heart of the master 'Were beating like prisoners assaulting their walls, Impatient to be where the battlefield calls ; Every nerve of the charger was strained to full play, With Sheridan only ten miles away. "Under his spurning feet, the road, Like an arrowy Alpine river...
Page 173 - ... SHERIDAN'S RIDE UP from the south, at break of day, Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay, The affrighted air with a shudder bore, Like a herald in haste to the chieftain's door, The terrible grumble, and rumble, and roar, Telling the battle was on once more, And Sheridan twenty miles away. And wider still those billows of war Thundered along the horizon's bar; And louder yet into Winchester rolled The roar of that red sea uncontrolled...
Page 174 - But there is a road from Winchester town, A good, broad highway leading down ; And there, through the flush of the morning light, A steed as black as the steeds of night Was seen to pass, as with eagle flight, As if he knew the terrible need : He stretched away with his utmost speed ; Hills rose and fell ; but his heart was gay, With Sheridan fifteen miles away.
Page 174 - He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray, With Sheridan only five miles away. The first that the General saw were the groups Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops. What was done? what to do? a glance told him both, Then striking his spurs, with a terrible oath, He dashed down the line 'mid a storm of huzzas, And the wave of retreat checked its course there, because The sight of the master compelled it to pause. With foam and with dust the black charger was gray; By the flash of his eye...
Page 174 - Swept on with his wild eyes full of fire, But lo ! he is nearing his heart's desire He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray With Sheridan only five miles away. "The first that the general saw were the groups Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops. What was done what to do a glance told him both ; Then striking his spurs with a terrible oath, He dashed down the line 'mid a storm of huzzas, And the wave of retreat checked its course there, because The sight of its master compelled...
Page 175 - He seemed to the whole great army to say, " I have brought you Sheridan all the way From Winchester down, to save the day !" Hurrah, hurrah for Sheridan ! Hurrah, hurrah for horse and man ! And when their statues are placed on high Under the dome of the Union sky The American soldier's temple of Fame There, with the glorious general's name, Be it said in letters both bold and bright, О ! " Here is the steed that saved the day By carrying Sheridan into the fight, From Winchester, twenty miles...
Page 174 - mid a storm of huzzas, And the wave of retreat checked its course there, because The sight of the master compelled it to pause. With foam and with dust the black charger was gray ; By the flash of his eye, and his red nostril's play, He seemed to the whole great army to say, " I have brought you Sheridan all the way From Winchester down, to save the day.
Page 141 - A woman, with an immense bundle on her head, was leading a mule by a rope-halter, walking with as stately a tread as did ever Cleopatra. Astride of the mule were two little children, the foremost one holding on to a large bundle, the other clasping her companion's waist.
Page 59 - ... Eighth, was a source of much amusement to the members of the latter regiment. In the field, clothing was a matter of little importance ; but when a haversack strap or a knapsack buckle broke at the beginning of a long march, or the sole came off a shoe at a slight stumble, which very often happened, the comments on the patriotism of those who provided for the wants of the army were more expressive than elegant. Although New Orleans and Algiers had been in the Union hands for over a year, the...
Page 163 - ... on the day following, and remained in camp until Sunday, the 28th, when the army again assumed the offensive, and advanced to Summit Point, a few miles beyond Charlestown. While these movements were being executed, skirmishing between the advance of one army and the rear of the other was continually going on, and the cavalry were almost constantly in the saddle.

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