Semantic Web: Concepts, Technologies and Applications

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 24, 2007 - Computers - 327 pages
3 Reviews

Although the Web is growing at an astounding pace, surpassing the 8 billion page mark, most pages are still designed for human consumption and cannot be processed by machines. Computers are used to display the information, but human intervention is still required to interpret the results. The Semantic Web unleashes a revolution of new possibilities in which content is given formal, machine processable semantics.

This book provides a well-paced introduction to the Semantic Web. It covers a wide range of topics, from new trends (ontologies, rules) to existing technologies (Web Services and software agents) to more formal aspects (logic and inference). It includes: real-world (and complete) examples of the application of Semantic Web concepts; how the technology presented and discussed throughout the book can be extended to other application areas, i.e. Geographic Information Sciences, Bioinformatics and Fine Arts.

  

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Review: Semantic Web: Concepts, Technologies and Applications

User Review  - TK Keanini - Goodreads

Great book to read for an introduction to the Semantic Web technology. Understand that this is about RDF/RDFS/OWL which sit at the heart of the W3C's semantic web standards. Read full review

Contents

The Future of the Internet
3
12 The Syntactic Web
4
13 The Semantic Web
6
15 What the Semantic Web Is Not
11
16 What Will Be the Side Effects of the Semantic Web
13
Web sites
14
Part II Concepts
15
Ontology in Computer Science
17
Methods for Ontology Development
154
82 Uschold and King Ontology Development Method
156
83 Toronto Virtual Enterprise Method
158
84 Methontology
159
85 KACTUS Project Ontology Development Method
163
87 Simplified Methods
167
872 Horrocks Ontology Development Method
171
Recommended Reading
172

22 Differences Among Taxonomies Thesauri and Ontologies
20
222 Thesauri Versus Ontologies
22
23 Classifying Ontologies
26
232 Classifying Ontologies According to Their Generality
27
233 Classifying Ontologies According to the Information Represented
28
24 Web Ontology Description Languages
29
25 Ontologies Categories and Intelligence
31
References
33
Knowledge Representation in Description Logic
35
32 An Informal Example
36
33 The Family of Attributive Languages
43
332 Terminologies
49
333 Assertions
51
34 Inference Problems
52
342 Inference Problems for Assertions
53
Recommended Reading
54
RDF and RDF Schema
56
42 XML Essentials
58
422 URIs and Namespaces
59
43 RDF
62
432 RDF Triples and Graphs
65
433 RDFXML
67
44 RDF Schema
71
442 Properties
74
443 Individuals
75
45 A Summary of the RDFRDF Schema Vocabulary
77
Recommended Reading
79
OWL
81
52 Requirements for Web Ontology Description Languages
82
53 Header Information Versioning and Annotation Properties
85
54 Properties
86
542 Property Characteristics
87
55 Classes
88
551 Class Descriptions Top and Bottom Classes
89
552 Class Axioms
95
56 Individuals
97
57 Datatypes
98
58 A Summary of the OWL Vocabulary
100
Recommended Reading
102
References
103
Rule Languages
104
62 Usage Scenarios for Rule Languages
105
63 Datalog
106
64 RuleML
108
65 SWRL
113
66 TRIPLE
121
Recommended Reading
124
Semantic Web Services
127
72 Web Service Essentials
129
722 Web Service Security Standards
131
723 Web Service Standardization Organizations
133
724 Potential Benefits and Criticism
134
73 OWLS Service Ontology
135
732 Service Profile What It Does
138
733 Service Model How It Does
139
734 Service Grounding How to Access
142
74 An OWLS Example
143
742 Informal Process Definition
145
743 OWLS Process Definition
146
References
151
Part III Technologies
153
Ontology Sources
175
92 Metadata
176
922 Dublin Core
178
923 Warwick Framework
179
924 PICS
181
926 FOAF
182
93 Upper Ontologies
184
932 KR Ontology
188
933 CYC
193
934 WordNet
195
95 Ontology Libraries
197
References
198
Semantic Web Software Tools
200
102 Metadata and Ontology Editors
202
1022 OilEd
203
1025 Protégé Plugins and APIs
207
103 Reasoners
209
104 Other Tools
211
References
214
Part IV Applications
216
Software Agents
217
112 Agent Forms
220
113 Agent Architecture
223
114 Agents in the Semantic Web Context
225
References
227
Semantic Desktop
229
122 Semantic Desktop Metadata
230
123 Semantic Desktop Ontologies
233
124 Semantic Desktop Architecture
235
125 Semantic Desktop Related Applications
237
References
238
Ontology Applications in Art
241
132 Ontologies for the Description of Works of Art
242
1322 The Union List of Artist Names
246
1323 A Visual Annotation Ontology for Art Images
249
133 Metadata Schemas for the Description of Works of Art
253
1332 The ISO 21127 A Reference Ontology for the Interchange of Cultural Heritage Information
255
1333 The Visual Resources Association Core Categories
256
134 Semantic Annotation of Art Images
260
References
263
Geospatial Semantic Web
265
142 Basic Geospatial Concepts
266
143 Classifying Geospatial Features
267
1432 Geospatial Feature Ontologies
271
144 Gazetteers
277
1442 Standards for Gazetteers
278
145 Geospatial Metadata
280
2003 Metadata Standard
285
2005 Service Metadata Standard
290
146 The OGC Catalogue Specification
293
147 Geospatial Web Services
295
1472 A Geospatial Web Services Architecture
297
1473 Example of an Integrated Collection of Geospatial Web Services Mission to Planet Earth
298
148 Examples of Spatial Data Infrastructures
300
1482 NSDI Overview
302
149 Example of a Metadata Catalogue for Earth Science Data
303
1492 GCMD and Other Data Sources
305
Recommended Reading
308
Index
313
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