The Life of Edmund Burke: Comprehending and Impartial Account of His Literary and Political Efforts, and a Sketch of the Conduct and Character of His Most Eminent Associates, Coadjutors, and Opponents, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Printed and pub. by G. Cawthorn, 1800
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Page 367 - But let us suppose all these moral difficulties got over. The ocean remains. You cannot pump this dry; and as long as it continues in its present bed, so long all the causes which weaken authority by distance will continue. ' Ye gods, annihilate but space and time, And make two lovers happy!
Page 361 - Young man, there is America, which at this day serves for little more than to amuse you with stories of savage men and uncouth manners ; yet shall, before you taste of death, show itself equal to the whole of that commerce which now attracts the envy of the world.
Page 363 - Religion, always a principle of energy, in this new people is no way worn out or impaired ; and their mode of professing it is also one main cause of this free spirit. The people are Protestants, and of that kind which is the most adverse to all implicit submission of mind and opinion.
Page 361 - If this state of his country had been foretold to him, would it not require all the sanguine credulity of youth, and all the fervid glow of enthusiasm, to make him believe it? Fortunate man, he has lived to see it ! Fortunate indeed, if he lives to see nothing that shall vary the prospect, and cloud the setting of his day ! Excuse me, sir, if, turning from such thoughts, I resume this comparative view once more.
Page 407 - ... and disturbs your government. These are, to change that spirit, as inconvenient, by removing the causes ; to prosecute it as criminal ; or to comply with it as necessary. I would not be guilty of an imperfect enumeration. I can think of but these three. Another has, indeed, been started that of giving up the colonies ; but it met so slight a reception, that I do not think myself obliged to dwell a great while upon it. It is nothing but a little sally of anger, like the frowardness of peevish...
Page 53 - WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling.
Page 156 - I should have believed Burke to be Junius, because I know no man but Burke who is capable of writing these letters ; but Burke spontaneously denied it to me.
Page 366 - ... your collectors and comptrollers, and of all the slaves that adhered to them. Such would, and, in no long time, must be, the effect of attempting to forbid as a crime, and to suppress as an evil, the command and blessing of Providence,
Page 364 - I do not think, Sir, that the reason of this averseness in the dissenting churches from all that looks like absolute government is so much to be sought in their religious tenets, as in their history.
Page 370 - The question with me is, not whether you have a right to render your people miserable ; but whether it is / not your interest to make them happy. It is not, what a lawyer tells me I may do ; but what humanity, reason, and justice, tell me I ought to do.

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