Elven's Heraldry (Google eBook)

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Page i - the chosen crest of our family, a bear, as ye observe, and rampant : because a good herald will depict every animal in its noblest posture, as a horse
Page 3 - of GREAT BRITAIN is a circle of gold, enriched with pearls and precious stones, and heightened up with, four crosses pattée, and four fleurs-de-lis alternately: from these rise four arch-diadems, adorned with pearls, which close under a mound ensigned by a cross pattée.
Page 1 - is a figure placed upon a wreath, coronet, or cap of maintenance, above both helmet and shield ; as, for instance, the crest of a bishop is the mitre. The
Page 20 - a river in Asia, from whence it takes its name. Next to the peacock, this is the most beautiful of birds. It is said when Croesus, King of Lydia, was seated on his throne, adorned with royal magnificence, he asked Solon, if he ever beheld any thing so fine and beautiful. The Greek philosopher, nowise moved by the pomp and pageantry around him, replied, that after having seen the beautiful
Page 48 - on which is written the Lord's Prayer ; on the top of the book a dove, proper, in its beak a crow-quill pen,
Page 8 - The leopard, panther, and the ounce, are all, in a certain degree, marked like this animal, except that the lines are broken by round spots, which cover the whole surface of the skin. The use of the tiger in heraldry is extensive.
Page 3 - and four fleurs-de-lis alternately: from these rise four arch-diadems, adorned with pearls, which close under a mound ensigned by a cross
Page 1 - the comb of a cock, denotes, in heraldry and armour, the uppermost part of an armorial bearing, or that part which rises over the casque or helmet, next to the mantle. In heraldry only, the crest is a figure placed upon a wreath, coronet, or cap of maintenance, above
Page 22 - THE SALAMANDER was described by the ancients as bred by fire and existing in flames ; an element which must inevitably prove the destruction of life. This fabulous assertion gave rise to its use in
Page 21 - gigantic size. The most eminent of this kind was the colossus of Rhodes, one of the wonders of the world, a brazen statue of Apollo, so high that ships passed in full sail

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