Scandinavia, Ancient and Modern: Being a History of Denmark, Sweden, and Norway: Comprehending a Description of These Countries; an Account of the Mythology, Government, Laws, Manners, and Institutions of the Early Inhabitants; and of the Present State of Society, Religion, Literature, Arts, and Commerce; with Illustrations of Their Natural History, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper and Brothers, 1878 - Natural history
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 374 - Created hugest that swim the ocean stream : Him haply slumbering on the Norway foam, The pilot of some small night-founder'd skiff Deeming some island, oft, as seamen tell, With fixed anchor in his scaly rind Moors by his side under the lee, while night Invests the sea, and wished morn delays...
Page 199 - Prince's aid-de-camp, who waited " upon him respecting the proffered flag of " truce, that the French fought bravely, but " that they could not have stood an hour the " fight which the Danes maintained for four. " I have been in one hundred and five engage" ments, said he, in the course of my life, but " that of to-day was the most terrible of all.
Page 116 - Charles himself looked on success as a matter of certainty, and the romantic extravagance of his views was continually increasing. "One year, he thought, would suffice for the conquest of Russia. The court of Rome was next to feel his vengeance, as the Pope had dared to oppose the concession of religious liberty to the Silesian Protestants. No enterprise at that time appeared impossible to him. He had even dispatched several officers privately into Asia and Egypt, to take plans of the towns and examine...
Page 292 - The sources from which these are derived arc a small assessment of grain in lieu of tithe from each farm, Easter and Christmas offerings, and dues for marriages, christenings, and funerals, which are pretty high. There are fiar prices, as in Scotland, by which payments in grain may be converted into money. In every prestegild there are several farms, besides the glebe, which belong to the living...
Page 104 - ... Senate formed neither a fifth order, nor an intermediate power between the King and the States ; and that it ought to be held simply as a Council, with whom the King might consult and advise. A College of Reunion was also established, at this Diet, for the purpose of making inquiry as to the lands granted, sold, mortgaged, or exchanged by preceding Kings, either in Sweden or Livonia ; with an offer on the part of the crown to reimburse the proprietors for such sums as they had originally paid...
Page 210 - ... to occupy, with a military Force, the Territory of Holstein, for the purpose of excluding Great Britain from all her accustomed channels of communication with the Continent ; of inducing or compelling the Court of Denmark to close the passage of the Sound against the British Commerce and Navigation; and of availing himself of the aid of the Danish Marine for the invasion of Great Britain and of Ireland.
Page 93 - have since experienced that the little finger of an absolute prince can be heavier than the loins of many nobles...
Page 202 - ... Russian noblemen was formed against the Emperor Paul, who was strangled in his chamber on the night of the 24th of March. His son and successor Alexander at once resolved to abandon the confederacy, and to cultivate the friendship of Great Britain. Sweden, Denmark, and Prussia followed his example ; and thus was dissolved, in less than six months after it had been formed, the League of the North, the most formidable confederacy ever arrayed against the maritime power of England.
Page 233 - ... neither was he to harass or persecute any person for his religious opinions, provided the promulgation of those opinions, or the exercise of that religion, were not injurious to the community. The council of justice was to consist of six nobles and six commoners, who were to decide in judicial affairs; the king had a double voice, and might pardon criminals, and mitigate or commute punishments. The king was not to quit the kingdom without consulting the state-council, and that council should...
Page 200 - ... repast which followed, the particulars of the convention, which ultimately took place, were arranged. Nelson told the prince the French fought bravely, but they could not have stood for one hour the fight which the Danes had supported for four. Melancholy tributes were paid by the people of Copenhagen to the brave men who had fallen in the conflict ; a public mausoleum was erected on the spot where the slain had been interred ; a monument...

Bibliographic information