The fall of Jerusalem. The martyr of Antioch. Belshazzar (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Murry, 1840 - Sanskrit poetry
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 339 - For as in the days that were before the flood, they were eating and drinking, marrying, and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark, and knew not, until the flood came, and took them all away ; so shall also ' the coming of the Son of man be.
Page 301 - By a son a man obtains victory over all people; by a son's son he enjoys immortality; and afterwards by the son of that grandson he reaches the solar abode.
Page 336 - Up the Raja, at the sign, upon his glittering chariot leaps, Instant Ganga the divine follows his majestic steps ; From the high heaven burst she forth, first on Siva's lofty crown ; Headlong then, and prone to earth, thundering rushed the cataract down. Swarms of bright-hued fish came dashing; turtles, dolphins, in their mirth, Fallen or falling, glancing, flashing, to the many-gleaming earth ; And all the host of heaven came down, sprites and genii in amaze, And each forsook his heavenly throne,...
Page 307 - Never to recede from combat, to protect the people, and to honour the priests, is the highest duty of kings and ensures their felicity. 89. Those rulers of the earth, who, desirous of defeating each other, exert their utmost strength in battle, without ever averting their faces, ascend after death directly to heaven.
Page 72 - Of those thy myriad barks mak'st passing music : Oh ! thou great silent city, with thy spires And palaces, where I was once the greatest, The happiest I, whose presence made a tumult In all your wondering streets and jocund marts : But most of all, thou cool and twilight air, That art a rapture to the breath ! The slave, The beggar, the most base down-trodden outcast, The plague-struck livid wretch, there's none so vile, So abject, in your streets, that swarm with life They may inhale...
Page 330 - By censuring his preceptor, though justly, he will be born an ass ; by falsely defaming him, a dog ; by using his goods without leave, a small worm ; by envying his merit, a larger insect or reptile.
Page 297 - Himavan its loftiest peak. There at length it came, and smiling thus the fish addressed the sage : To the peak of Himalaya, bind thou now thy stately ship." At the fish's mandate quickly to the peak of Himavan Bound the sage his bark, and ever to this day, that loftiest peak, Bears the name of Manhubandhan from the binding of the bark.
Page 318 - Let him take up his consecrated fire, and all his domestic implements of making oblations to it, and, departing from the town to the forest, let him dwell in it with complete power over his organs of sense and of action.
Page 316 - Though inobservant of approved usages, or enamoured of another woman, or devoid of good qualities, yet a husband must constantly be revered as a god by a virtuous wife.
Page 353 - THE BORROWER WILL BE CHARGED AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. I...

Bibliographic information