Oedipus at Colonus (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Drama
31 Reviews
This play forms a bridge between the events in Oedipus the King and Antigone. It begins with the arrival of Oedipus in Colonus after years of wandering; it ends with Antigone setting off toward her own fate in Thebes.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
9
3 stars
11
2 stars
4
1 star
2

Review: Oedipus at Colonus (The Theban Plays #2)

User Review  - Syahira Sharif - Goodreads

Basically I am reading these series out of order but I know enough about Oedipus Rex and Antigone that I could emphatize with the final days of Oedipus who really is the unluckiest man on earth ... Read full review

Review: Oedipus at Colonus (The Theban Plays #2)

User Review  - Cecilia - Goodreads

This play was very interesting, as it was the very last one that Sophocles wrote.The death of Oedipus was certainly one of the most beautiful deaths I have ever had the probl edge to read. It was very ... Read full review

Related books

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

The Greek dramatist Sophocles, born to a wealthy family at Colonus, near Athens, was admired as a boy for his personal beauty and musical skill. He served faithfully as a treasurer and general for Athens when it was expanding its empire and influence. In the dramatic contests, he defeated Aeschylus in 468 b.c. for first prize in tragedy, wrote a poem to Herodotus (see Vol. 3), and led his chorus and actors in mourning for Euripides just a few months before his own death. He wrote approximately 123 plays, of which 7 tragedies are extant, as well as a fragment of his satiric play, Ichneutae (Hunters). His plays were produced in the following order: Ajax (c.450 b.c.), Antigone (441 b.c.), Oedipus Tyrannus (c.430 b.c.), Trachiniae (c.430 b.c.), Electra (between 418 and 410 b.c.), Philoctetes (409 b.c.), and Oedipus at Colonus (posthumously in 401 b.c.). With Sophocles, Greek tragedy reached its most characteristic form. He added a third actor, made each play independent---that is, not dependent on others in a trilogy---increased the numbers of the chorus, introduced the use of scenery, shifted the focus from religious to more philosophical issues, and brought language and characters, though still majestic, nearer to everyday life. His finely delineated characters are responsible for the tragedy that befalls them, and they accept it heroically. Aristotle (see Vols. 3, 4, and 5) states that Sophocles said he portrayed people as they ought to be; Euripides, as they are. His utter command of tragic speech in the simple grandeur of his choral odes, dialogues, and monologues encourages the English reader to compare him to Shakespeare (see Vol. 1).

Bibliographic information