The American Museum Journal, Volume 11 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
American Museum of Natural History, 1911 - Natural history
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Page 131 - ... of course, among which the following may be mentioned : He was President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the meeting at Burlington, Vermont, in 1867, and in the same year his Alma Mater conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws. In 1868 he was elected president of the Lyceum of Natural History of the City of New York (which in 1876 became the New York Academy of Sciences), and he remained its president by annual reelection until his death, twenty-four years...
Page 43 - ... leading us after some forest eland. The atmosphere of the forest was almost unbreathable with its Turkish-bath heat, its reeking moisture, and its powerful smell of decaying, rotting vegetation. We seemed, in fact, to be transported back to Miocene times, to an age and a climate scarcely suitable for the modern type of real humanity. Severe attacks of fever prostrated not only the Europeans, but all the black men of the party, and we were obliged to give up the search and return to the grasslands...
Page 125 - Nature-study in the museum is a newer part of the same educational movement. The great museum can, however, do what neither school, college, nor even the university can; it can bring a vision of the whole world of nature, a vision which cannot be given in books, in classrooms, or in laboratories. This is a branch of public education which is especially urgent in a great city, crowded with the works of man, and where except for the nightly vision of the heavens obscured by smoke and dust, and the...
Page 124 - Therefore, in the development of our halls there is a constant effort to shut out the human artificial element, to bring the visitor directly under the spell of nature, as under a great and infinitely gifted teacher, by making every case, every exhibit, tell some clear and simple story which appeals at once to the imagination, to the reasoning instinct, and to the heart.
Page 208 - In which the American Museum of Natural History, the New York Zoological Society, the New York Botanical Gardens and the National Museum at Washington cooperated with the US Bureau of Fisheries.
Page 43 - Congo forest with my expedition, accompanied also by Mr. Doggett, the naturalist attached to my staff. For several days we searched for the Okapi, but in vain. We were shown its supposed tracks by the natives, but as these were footprints of a cloven-hoofed animal, while we expected to see the spoor of a horse, we believed the natives to be deceiving us, and to be merely leading us after some forest eland. The atmosphere of the forest was almost unbreathable with its Turkish-bath heat, its reeking...
Page 89 - From the name spoonbill-cat by which it is often known, one might think it a catfish; but it is not a catfish. It is a ganoid, or a member of that ancient group of fishes which includes the sturgeon and a few other forms. In earlier geologic times ganoids were the dominant race of fish, at one period of their evolution...
Page 124 - In the development of our halls there is a constant effort to shut out the human artificial element, to bring the visitor directly under the spell of Nature, as under a great and infinitely gifted teacher, by making every case, every exhibit, tell some clear and simple story which appeals at once to the imagination, to the reasoning instinct and to the heart. There are three especial ends we are...

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