Bulletin, Issues 192-205 (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1911 - Agriculture
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Page 30 - LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF, Washington, DC, September 1, 1908.
Page 75 - LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF, Washington, DC, April 15, 1911.
Page 62 - The best estimates obtainable as to the amount of water required to produce a pound of dry matter...
Page 51 - Newfoundland into this country during the year 1907; whilst, according to the statistics published by the Bureau of Statistics of the Department of Commerce...
Page 128 - ... culture is to be tried in a sandy or gravelly soil deficient in peat or peatlike matter, the plants should be set in separate holes or trenches about 12 inches deep in a mixture of two to four parts of peat or half-rotted oak leaves to one part of clean sand. The excavations should be wide enough to provide ample space for new growth of the roots, not less than a foot each way from the old root ball. In small plantings, if the materials for the mixture are easily available in quantity, an 8-inch...
Page 103 - COOK. Bionomist in Charge of Office of Crop Acclimatization, Bureau of Plant Industry. US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC DAVID FAIRCHILD, Agricultural Explorer in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, Bureau of Plant Industry, US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC GEORGE M.
Page 6 - ... is the simplest index of deterioration through the action of micro-organisms. All three will be discussed in detail in the second part of this paper. PART II. METHODS OF EXAMINING CORN. CONDITIONS TO BE CONSIDERED. In the examination of corn for deterioration two conditions must be considered: (1) The detection in otherwise sound corn of factors which render it liable to spoil at some future time, and (2) the detection of actual deterioration. The...
Page 22 - Meyer, agricultural explorer in the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction of the Bureau of Plant Industry...
Page 41 - The fruit of this particular variety has a bright orange-red color, grows to a large size, measuring 3 to 5 Inches In diameter, and sometimes weighs more than a pound. It is perfectly seedless, Is not astringent, and can be eaten even when green and hard. It stands shipping remarkably well. The fruit is of a peculiar shape, having an equatorial constriction, which makes it look as If two fruits had been joined, or, to use a more terse expression, as if somebody had sat upon It. The trees are very...

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