Context (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Tachyon Publications, Oct 1, 2011 - Technology & Engineering - 238 pages
32 Reviews
One of the Web’s most celebrated high-tech culture mavens returns with this second collection of essays and polemics. Discussing complex topics in an accessible manner, Cory Doctorow’s visions of a future where artists have full freedom of expression is tempered with his understanding that creators need to benefit from their own creations. From extolling the Etsy makerverse to excoriating Apple for dumbing down technology while creating an information monopoly, each unique piece is brief, witty, and at the cutting edge of tech. Now a stay-at-home dad as well as an international activist, Doctorow writes as eloquently about creating real-time Internet theater with his daughter as he does while lambasting the corporations that want to profit from inherent intellectual freedoms.
  

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Review: Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century

User Review  - John Orman - Goodreads

Described as a political activist and Renaissance geek, Doctorow is well-wired into the high-tech pop culture, and if fact is a frequent contributor to Wired magazine. This book is Doctorow's second ... Read full review

Review: Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century

User Review  - Rick - Goodreads

Some good pieces on copyright in the internet age and net neutrality, among other topics. Definitely a good read if you're interested in internet freedoms and privacy. Read full review

Contents

Foreword by Tim OReilly
9
Why the Computer Is Not a Scary Monster
11
Teen Sex
15
Writing for Young Audiences
19
Teaching Web Literacy
23
Writing in the Age of Distraction
29
Extreme Geek
34
How to Stop Your Inbox Exploding
42
Not Every Cloud Has a Silver Lining
137
Why I Wont Buy an iPad and Think You Shouldnt Either
141
Can You Survive a Benevolent Dictatorship?
148
Curated Computing Is No Substitute for the Personal and Handmade
154
Doctorows First Law
158
Reports of Bloggings Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated
165
Streaming Will Never Stop Downloading
168
Search Is Too Important to Leave to One CompanyEven Google
174

What I Do
46
When Im Dead How Will My Loved Ones Break My Password?
57
Radical Presentism
62
A Cosmopolitan Literature for the Cosmopolitan Web
67
When Love Is Harder to Show Than Hate
72
Think Like a Dandelion
76
Do It Yourself
81
New York Meet Silicon Valley
91
The Price Is Right
98
You Shouldnt Have to Sell Your Soul Just to Download Some Music
105
Its All About the Leverage
108
Proprietary Interest
115
Intellectual Property Is a Silly Euphemism
119
Saying Information Wants to Be Free Does More Harm Than Good
123
Chris Andersons Free Adds Much to The Long Tail but Falls Short
126
Why Economics Condemns 3D to Be No More Than a Blockbuster Gimmick
134
Copyright Enforcers Should Learn Lessons from the War on Spam
177
Three Strikes and Youre Out
182
For Whom the Net Tolls
185
How Do You Know If Copyright Is Working?
190
What Do the Times Paywall Numbers Mean?
200
Persistence Pays Parasites
206
Like Teenagers Computers Are Built to Hook Up
211
A Modest Proposal
215
Personal Data Is as Hot as Nuclear Waste
220
Memento Mori
224
Love the Machine Hate the Factory
228
Untouched by Human Hands
231
Close Enough for Rock n Roll
234
About the Author
239
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Cory Doctorow is a science-fiction novelist, blogger, and technology activist whom Entertainment Weekly called “the William Gibson of his generation.” He is the author of the best-sellers Little Brother, Makers, Pirate Cinema, and Homeland and the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing. Doctorow is a contributor to the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, Locus, and many other newspapers, magazines, and websites. He was the director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy standards, and treaties.

Bibliographic information