How We Think

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Kessinger Publishing, Apr 1, 2004 - Psychology - 236 pages
12 Reviews
1910. Dewey, Professor of Philosophy in Columbia University writes: Our schools are troubled with a multiplication of studies, each in turn having its own multiplication of materials and principles. Our teachers find their tasks made heavier in that they have come to deal with pupils individually and not merely in mass. Unless these steps in advance are to end in distraction, some clue of unity, some principle that makes for simplification must be found. This book represents the conviction that the needed steadying and centralizing factor is found in adopting as the end of endeavor that attitude of mind, that habit of thought, which we call scientific. This scientific attitude of mind might, conceivably, be quite irrelevant to teaching children and youth. But this book also represents the conviction that such is not the case; that the native and unspoiled attitude of childhood, marked by ardent curiosity, fertile imagination, and love of experimental inquiry is near, very near, to the attitude of the scientific mind. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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Review: How We Think

User Review  - Parnell - Goodreads

John Dewey is an excellent writer, thinker, and philosopher. While much of his train of thought into what thought is and how it operates is largely supplanted by modern psychology and neuroscience the ... Read full review

Review: How We Think

User Review  - Ecbiv - Goodreads

Maybe I am coming from the age of the influenced, but most of the ideas that are laid out in this book are something I might consider obvious; however, this isn't to discount the validity and insight ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

John Dewey was born in 1859 in Burlington, Vermont. He founded the Laboratory School at the University of Chicago in 1896 to apply his original theories of learning based on pragmatism and "directed living." This combination of learning with concrete activities and practical experience helped earn him the title, "father of progressive education." After leaving Chicago he went to Columbia University as a professor of philosophy from 1904 to 1930, bringing his educational philosophy to the Teachers College there. Dewey was known and consulted internationally for his opinions on a wide variety of social, educational and political issues. His many books on these topics began with Psychology (1887), and include The School and Society (1899), Experience and Nature (1925), and Freedom and Culture (1939).Dewey died of pneumonia in 1952.

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