The book of nature (Google eBook)

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J. & J. Harper, 1837 - 467 pages
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Page xiii - And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons.
Page 364 - When in broad daylight I open my eyes, it is not in my power to choose whether I shall see or no, or to determine what particular objects shall present themselves to my view; and so likewise as to the hearing and other senses, the ideas imprinted on them are not creatures of my will. There is therefore some other Will or Spirit that produces them.
Page 46 - While the Particles continue entire, they may compose Bodies of one and the same Nature and Texture in all Ages : But should they wear away, or break in pieces, the Nature of Things depending on them would be changed.
Page 39 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began ; When Nature underneath a heap Of jarring atoms lay, And could not heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, Arise, ye more than dead. Then cold and hot and moist and dry In order to their stations leap, And Music's power obey. From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began : From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man.
Page 80 - These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens...
Page 410 - Come, pensive Nun, devout and pure, Sober, steadfast, and demure, All in a robe of darkest grain, Flowing with majestic train, And sable stole of cypress lawn Over thy decent shoulders drawn. Come; but keep thy wonted state, With even step, and musing gait, And looks commercing with the skies, Thy rapt soul sitting in thine eyes...
Page 47 - Particles, would not be of the same Nature and Texture now, with Water and Earth composed of entire Particles in the Beginning. And therefore, that Nature may be lasting, the Changes of corporeal Things are to be placed only in the various Separations and new Associations and Motions of these permanent Particles; compound Bodies being apt to break, not in the midst of solid Particles, but where those Particles are laid together, and only touch in a few Points.
Page 449 - Raised by thy breath, has quench'd the orb of day ? To-morrow he repairs the golden flood And warms the nations with redoubled ray. Enough for me : with joy I see The different doom our fates assign: Be thine Despair and sceptred Care, To triumph and to die are mine.
Page 458 - Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact; One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman; the lover, all as frantic. Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt; The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling.
Page 433 - Down dropt, and all the faded roses shed : Speechless he stood and pale, till thus at length First to himself he inward silence broke.

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