The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust, 1941-1945

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New Press, 2007 - History - 458 pages
4 Reviews
In this landmark "The Abandonment of the Jews, " David S. Wyman argues that a substantial commitment to rescue European Jews on the part of the United States almost certainly could have saved several hundred thousand of the Nazis' victims. The definitive work on its subject, "The Abandonment of the Jews" is the winner of the National Jewish Book Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Award, the Present Tense Literary Award, the Stuart Bernath Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and the Theodore Saloutos Award of the Immigration History Society, and was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

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Review: The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust 1941-1945

User Review  - Rick Massey - Goodreads

Well documented and researched, this book looks at how the western world turned its back on the Jews during the holocaust. Read full review

Review: The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust 1941-1945

User Review  - Michael Powe - Goodreads

A dense historical monograph, not for the fainthearted. Not for anyone with poor eyesight, either -- 350 pages of tiny print. The meticulous detail brings to mind the famous remark about the banality ... Read full review

Contents

A PLAN TO EXTERMINATE ALL JEWS
17
The Worst Is Confirmed
42
First Steps
61
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

David S. Wyman is Josiah DuBois Professor of History and of Judaic Studies, Emeritus, at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His previous publications include The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust, 1941-1945 and Paper Walls: America and the Refugee Crisis, 1938-1941. He is also the editor of the thirteen-volume America and the Holocaust. Charles H. Rosenzveig is the founder and executive vice president of the Holocaust Memorial Center in West Bloomfield, Michigan, the first free-standing Holocaust center in the United States.

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