Woodcraft: Or, Hawks about the Dovecote; a Story of the South at the Close of the Revolution (Google eBook)

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W. J. Widdleton, 1854 - American fiction - 518 pages
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Review: Woodcraft, Or, Hawks About The Dovecote: A Story Of The South At The Close Of The Revolution

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. So many themes are explored, in such an effortless manner, fluidly transitioning, all the while never usurping the work of paramount importance: the tale telling ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
5
II
10
III
13
IV
18
V
23
VI
26
VII
31
VIII
38
XXXIV
226
XXXV
236
XXXVI
244
XXXVII
250
XXXVIII
258
XXXIX
268
XL
278
XLI
288

IX
46
X
56
XI
64
XII
73
XIII
77
XIV
85
XV
91
XVI
95
XVII
101
XVIII
107
XIX
119
XX
121
XXI
132
XXII
138
XXIII
145
XXIV
153
XXV
158
XXVI
167
XXVII
173
XXVIII
179
XXIX
186
XXX
195
XXXI
205
XXXII
212
XXXIII
221
XLII
294
XLIII
304
XLIV
317
XLV
324
XLVI
335
XLVII
346
XLVIII
353
XLIX
367
L
375
LI
382
LII
391
LIII
398
LIV
408
LV
415
LVI
426
LVII
437
LVIII
453
LIX
461
LX
465
LXI
474
LXII
481
LXIII
491
LXIV
500
LXV
507

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Popular passages

Page 114 - ... Here's twenty guineas that Colonel Singleton gave me more than a month ago. If you're willing, we'll put yours and mine in the same bag, and you shall have the keeping of it." " You're a good boy, Lance, and I love you ; but dn your guineas. What should make you think that I want 'em? What should make you think so meanly of me as to suppose that I would rob you of your little stock in trade ?" " But it's no robbery, captain — I'm glad to — " " Pooh, pooh ! Put up your guineas, Lance. You'll...
Page 513 - em. Free nigger no hab any body for fin' 'em he bittle [victuals]; and de man wha' hab sense and good maussa, at de same time, he's a dn pretickilar great big fool, for let he maussa off from keep 'em and fin' 'em. I no guine to be free no way you kin fix it; so, maussa, don't you bodder me wid dis nonsense t'ing "bout free paper any more. I's well off whar...
Page 427 - Why are you armed to the teeth, and why am I arrested with violence on the peaceful highway? Who are you, and what do you take me for?' 'For a person that's after no good, stranger!' was the answer of Lance Frampton. 'We hear that there's some enemies of Captain Porgy after him, who want to seize him and his negroes, and we are jest here to see that they do no such thing!' 'Why, who is there to take his property?" 'Who! I don't know; but they are enemies, and varmints, sheriffs, and such like tory...
Page 513 - No ! no ! maussa," he cried, with a sly shake of the head, " I kain't t'ink ob letting you off dis way. Ef / doesn't b'long to you, you b'longs to me ! You hab for keep dis nigger long as he lib ; and him for keep you. You hab for fin' he dinner, and Tom hab for cook 'em.
Page 513 - Tom, jes' as much as me Tom b'long to you; and you nebber guine git you free paper from me long as you lib.
Page 182 - It was the most dull, melancholy, dreary ride that any one could possibly take, of about one hundred miles, through the woods of that country, which I had been accustomed to see abound with live stock, and wild fowl of every kind.
Page 192 - I shall not hare the opportunity. They may take advantage of my absence — they may steal you away— coming on you by surprise. If they should do so, Tom, I rely upon you to put yourself to death, sooner than abandon me and become the slave of another.
Page 182 - ... was to be found. The squirrels and birds of every kind were totally destroyed. .The dragoons told me, that on their scouts, no living creature was to be seen, except now and then a few camp scavengers,* picking the bones of some unfortunate fellows, who had been shot or cut down, and left in the woods above ground.
Page 182 - I then possessed about two hundred slaves ; and not one of them left me during the war, although they had had great offers, nay, some were carried down to work on the British lines, yet they always contrived to make their escape and return home. My plantation I found to be a desolate place ; stock of every kind taken off; the furniture carried away ; and my estate had been under sequestration."] FRIDAY, January 21.
Page 197 - ... You was always for pulling up the corn to see if it had sprouted ; and for planting over jest when it was beginning to grow. I've known a many of that sort of people, preticklarly among you wise people, and gentlemen born. It ain't reasonable to think that a man kin find new wisdom about everything ; and them sort of people who talk so fine, and strange, and sensible, in a new way, about the business that has been practised ever since the world begun, they're always overdoing the business, and...

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