Acts of the General Assembly of the State of Virginia: Passed at Called Session, 1862, in the Eighty-seventh Year of the Commonwealth (Google eBook)

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W. F. Ritchie, public printer, 1862 - Law - 36 pages
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Page 3 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 4 - That in controversies respecting property, and in suits between man and man, the ancient trial by jury is preferable to any other, and ought to be held sacred.
Page 16 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief...
Page 4 - ... they should, at fixed periods, be reduced to a private station, return into that body from which they were originally taken, and the vacancies be supplied by frequent, certain, and regular elections, in which all, or any part of the former members to be again eligible or ineligible, as the laws shall direct.
Page 4 - That general warrants, whereby an officer or messenger may be commanded to search suspected places without evidence of a fact committed, or to seize any person or persons not named, or whose offence is not particularly described and supported by evidence, are grievous and oppressive, and ought not to be granted.
Page 4 - That elections of members to serve as representatives of the people in assembly, ought to be free ; and that all men having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to the community, have the right of suffrage...
Page 4 - That, in all capital or criminal prosecutions, a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation, to be confronted with the accusers and witnesses, to call for evidence in his favor, and to a speedy trial by an impartial jury of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty...
Page 15 - Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member, but not a second time for the same cause; and shall have all other powers necessary for a branch of the legislature of a free state.
Page 24 - Judges may be removed from office by a concurrent vote of both Houses of the General Assembly, but a majority of all the members elected to each House must concur in such vote, and the cause of removal shall be entered on the Journal of each House. The Judge against whom the General Assembly may be about to proceed, shall...
Page 16 - ... all men shall be free to profess, and by argument, to maintain their opinions in matters of religion; and the same shall, in no wise, affect, diminish or enlarge their civil capacities...

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