The Early American Republic: A Documentary Reader

Front Cover
Sean Patrick Adams
John Wiley & Sons, Oct 20, 2008 - History - 225 pages
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With voices ranging from those of presidents to slaves, from both men and women, and from Native Americans and white settlers, this book tells the story of the first half-century of the United States.
  • Provides students with over 50 essential documents from the Early Republic: the first five decades of the USA
  • Includes lesser-known documents, for example Thomas Jefferson’s rules for ‘republican etiquette’
  • Incorporates eyewitness testimony from major historical figures, alongside that of ordinary people from the period
  • Includes an introduction, document headnotes and questions at the end of each chapter designed to encourage students to engage with the material critically
  

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Contents

Traveling the Early American Republic
1
Origins
13
The First American Party System
21
A Massachusetts Farmer Attacks the Federalists 1798
27
A New Name for the United States? 1803
33
Whose Land?
41
An Eyewitness Account of the Battle of New Orleans 1816
54
The Future Course of the Republic?
67
Maria Stewart Speaks at the African Masonic Hall 1833
137
The Rise of the Common Man
147
Sarah Grimke Defends the Rights of Women 1837
155
John Ross Explains the Position of the Cherokee Nation 1834
162
Henry Clay on Whig Strategy 1838
169
Contents
171
The Mississippi and Beyond
177
Notchiningas Map of the Upper Mississippi 1837
183

An Englishwoman Remembers Her First Illinois Winter 1848
83
Two Views on the Morality of Capitalism in
96
A New Urban America
102
The Soul of the Republic
115
Improvement of Body and Soul
122
AntiSlavery to Abolition
131
Walter Colton on the Discovery of Gold in California 1850
191
An American Sergeants Perspective on the War with
199
The President and the ExSlave
208
Bibliography
214
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Sean Patrick Adams is Associate Professor of History at the University of Florida, where he teaches courses in Nineteenth-Century U.S. History. He is the author of numerous publications, most notably Old Dominion, Industrial Commonwealth: Coal, Politics, and Economy in Antebellum America (2004).