As You Like it: A Comedy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
S. Gosnell, 1810 - 103 pages
309 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
87
4 stars
87
3 stars
91
2 stars
34
1 star
10

Such a wonderful love story. - Goodreads
Anyway, I love happy ending. - Goodreads
It has a beautiful ending keepin aside the odds. - Goodreads
Kind of hard to read. - Goodreads

Review: As You Like It

User Review  - Sarah Bynum - Goodreads

Really, Jaques is the reason for reading this. Read full review

Review: As You Like It

User Review  - Edward Cheer - Goodreads

A story of finding love in strange places. It's cute, it's funny, but other than that there isn't much else to say about it. Read full review

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 23 - O good old man ; how well in thee appears The constant service of the antique world, When service sweat for duty, not for meed...
Page 33 - Under the shade of melancholy boughs, Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time; If ever you have look'd on better days; If ever been where bells have knoll'd to church ; If ever sat at any good man's feast ; If ever from your eyelids wip'da tear, And know what 'tis to pity and be pitied; Let gentleness my strong enforcement be : In the which hope, I blush, and hide my sword.
Page 28 - Ay, now am I in Arden ; the more fool I ; when I was at home, I was in a better place : but travellers must be content.
Page 34 - This wide and universal theatre Presents more woeful pageants than the scene Wherein we play in. Jaq. All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players : They have their exits and their entrances ; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages.
Page 24 - The seasons' difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's wind ; Which when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile, and say, This is no flattery : these are counsellors, That feelingly persuade me what I am. Sweet are the uses of adversity ; Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, Wears yet a precious jewel in his head ; And this our life, exempt from public haunt, Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, Sermons in stones, and...
Page 32 - how the world wags: Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, And after one hour more 'twill be eleven; And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe, And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale.
Page 37 - I like it very well ; but in respect 15 that it is private, it is a very vile life. Now, in respect it is in the fields, it pleaseth me well ; but in respect it is not in the court, it is tedious.
Page 34 - With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank ; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
Page 27 - I have neither the scholar's melancholy, which is emulation ; nor the musician's, which is fantastical; nor the courtier's, which is proud; nor the soldier's, which is ambitious ; nor the lawyer's, which is politic ; nor the lady's, which is nice ; nor the lover's, which is all these...
Page 53 - Hero had turned nun, if it had not been for a hot midsummer night; for, good youth, he went but forth to wash him in the Hellespont and being taken with the cramp was drowned: and the foolish chroniclers of that age found it was ' Hero of Sestos.' But these are all lies : men have died from time to time and worms have eaten them, but not for love.

Bibliographic information