On Love and Death

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Rookery Press, 2006 - Literary Collections - 76 pages
14 Reviews
In On Love and Death Patrick Suskind reveals the hidden source of his mesmerizing fiction: an obsession with the darkly erotic link between love and death. In this witty and thought-provoking meditation on the two elemental forces of human existence, he brilliantly draws on scenes as contemporary as a young couple having oral sex in a traffic jam, as literary as Thomas Mann's discovery of forbidden love at an advanced age, and as mythical as the stories of death conquered through love in the narratives of Orpheus and Jesus.

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Review: On Love and Death

User Review  - Cristina Chițu - Goodreads

I love Süskind, I always will. I enjoy his way of writing and his visible passion. However, there are some truths in this book I could never agree with. Why only 2 stars? Because I expect more from Süskind. Read full review

Review: On Love and Death

User Review  - Lisa - Goodreads

Mr Suskind's style of writing is beautiful, romantic and a litte bit eerie. In this book, he analyzes two of the most significant of human events. I found myself charmed even though he was explaining ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
17
Section 2
22
Section 3
31
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Patrick Suskind was born in Germany in 1949. Kurt Cobain, singer and songwriter for Nirvana, was a fan of Suskind's work and based a song on Perfume, a novel that had already developed a cult following in Europe and America.

Anthea Bell was born in Suffolk, was educated at Somerville College, Oxford, and works as a translator, primarily from German and French. Her translations include works of non-fiction, literary and popular fiction, and books for young people including classic German works by the Brothers Grimm, Clemens Brentano, Wilhelm Hauff and Christian Morgenstern. She has been the recipient of a number of translation prizes and awards including the 1987 Schlegel-Tieck Award for Hans Berman's The Stone and the Flute, the Marsh Award for Children's Literature in Translation for Christine Nöstlinger's A Dog's Life, the 2002 Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator's Prize for her translation of W.G. Sebald's novel Austerlitz, and the Oxford Weidenfeld Translation Prize in 2009 for How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone.

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