The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Comprising His Essays, Lectures, Poems, and Orations, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Bell & Daldy, 1866
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Contents

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Page 425 - HE who has a thousand friends has not a friend to spare, And he who has one enemy will meet him everywhere.
Page 171 - The problem of restoring to the world original and eternal beauty, is solved by the redemption of the soul. The ruin or the blank, that we see when we look at nature, is in our own eye.
Page 175 - ... planter, who is Man sent out into the field to gather food, is seldom cheered by any idea of the true dignity of his ministry. He sees his bushel and his cart, and nothing beyond, and sinks into the farmer, instead of Man on the farm. The tradesman scarcely ever gives an ideal worth to his work, but is ridden by the routine of his craft, and the soul is subject to dollars. The priest becomes a form ; the attorney, a statute-book ; the mechanic, a machine ; the sailor, a rope of the ship.
Page 196 - It is a low benefit to give me something ; it is a high benefit to enable me to do somewhat of myself. The time is coming when all men will see that the gift of God to the soul is not a vaunting, overpowering, excluding sanctity, but a sweet, natural goodness, a goodness like thine and mine, and that so invites thine and mine to be and to grow.
Page 152 - A man conversing in earnest, if he watch his intellectual processes, will find that a material image, more or less luminous, arises in his mind, contemporaneous with every thought, which furnishes the vestment of the thought.
Page 169 - Man is all symmetry, Full of proportions, one limb to another, And all to all the world besides: Each part may call the farthest, brother : For head with foot hath private amity, And both with moons and tides.
Page 149 - No reason can be asked or given why the soul seeks beauty. Beauty, in its largest and profoundest sense, is one expression for the universe. God is the all-fair. Truth and goodness and beauty 'are but different faces of the same All.
Page 179 - There is then creative reading as well as creative writing. When the mind is braced by labor and invention, the page of whatever book we read becomes luminous with manifold allusion. Every sentence is doubly significant, and the sense of our author is as broad as the world.
Page 100 - The first leaf of the New Testament it does not open. It believes in a Providence which does not treat with levity a pound sterling. They are neither transcendentalists nor Christians. They put up no Socratic prayer, much less any saintly prayer for the queen's mind ; ask neither for light nor right, but say bluntly, " grant her in health and wealth long to live." And one traces this Jewish prayer in all English private history, from the prayers of King Richard, in Richard of Devizes' Chronicle,...
Page 149 - Nature is the vehicle of thought, and in a simple, double, and three-fold degree. 1 . Words are signs of natural facts. 2 . Particular natural facts are symbols of particular spiritual facts. 3 . Nature is the symbol of spirit.

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