Candide: Or, Optimism

Front Cover
Penguin, 1947 - Fiction - 144 pages
94 Reviews
A deluxe edition of Voltaire's satirical masterpiece with cover art by Chris Ware

With its vibrant new translation, perceptive introduction, and witty packaging, this new edition of Voltaire’s masterpiece belongs in the hands of every reader pondering our assumptions about human behavior and our place in the world. Candide tells of the hilarious adventures of the naïve Candide, who doggedly believes that “all is for the best” even when faced with injustice, suffering, and despair. Controversial and entertaining, Candide is a book that is vitally relevant today in our world pervaded by—as Candide would say—“the mania for insisting that all is well when all is by no means well.”

For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


  

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The ending of Candide was just right. - Goodreads
I felt the ending happened too fast though. - Goodreads
Which leads me to the illustrations. - Goodreads

Review: Candide

User Review  - Atte - Goodreads

Great little read, with plenty of insights hidden between the lines and misery of Candide. Liked it much more than I anticipated I would. Read full review

Review: Candide

User Review  - Jasen Herrera - Goodreads

Who can be Candide in that world? Or this world we live in now? Are they really that different? Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
How Candide was brought up in a beautiful
19
in How Candide escaped from the Bulgars and what
25
Describing tempest shipwreck and earthquake
32
dide the Grand Inquisitor and the Jew
44
How Candide killed the brother of his beloved
65
What Candide and Martin discussed as they
94
Candides journey to Constantinople
128
woman once more
137
Copyright

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About the author (1947)

François-Marie Arouet, writing under the pseudonym Voltaire, was born in 1694 into a Parisian bourgeois family. Educated by Jesuits, he was an excellent pupil but one quickly enraged by dogma. An early rift with his father--who wished him to study law--led to his choice of letters as a career. Insinuating himself into court circles, he became notorious for lampoons on leading notables and was twice imprisoned in the Bastille.

By his mid-thirties his literary activities precipitated a four-year exile in England where he won the praise of Swift and Pope for his political tracts. His publication, three years later in France, of Lettres philosophiques sur les Anglais (1733)--an attack on French Church and State--forced him to flee again. For twenty years Voltaire lived chiefly away from Paris. In this, his most prolific period, he wrote such satirical tales as "Zadig" (1747) and "Candide" (1759). His old age at Ferney, outside Geneva, was made bright by his adopted daughter, "Belle et Bonne," and marked by his intercessions in behalf of victims of political injustice. Sharp-witted and lean in his white wig, impatient with all appropriate rituals, he died in Paris in 1778--the foremost French author of his day.

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