Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

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Society, 1871 - Scotland
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Page 255 - IN MEMORY OF ALEXANDER SELKIRK, MARINER, A native of Largo, in the county of Fife, Scotland, who lived on this island in complete solitude for four years and four months. He was landed from the Cinque Ports galley, 96 tons, 18 guns, AD 1704, and was taken off in the Duke, privateer, 12th February, 1709.
Page 264 - ... cairns that part of their clothing which covered the part affected ; also, if they have at home any beast that is diseased, they have only to bring some of the meal which it feeds upon, and make it into paste with these waters, and afterwards give it to him to eat, which will prove an infallible cure ; but they must likewise throw upon the cairn the rope or halter with which he was led.
Page 258 - Alexander Selcraig, according to the session's appointment, compeared before the pulpit, and made acknowledgment of his sin in disagreeing with his brothers, and was rebuked in the face of the congregation for it, and promised amendment in the strength of the Lord, and so was dismissed.
Page 264 - ... for any bodily pain, fractured limb, or sore that they are bathing, they throw upon one of these cairns that part of their clothing which covered the part affected ; also if they have at home any beast that is diseased, they have only to bring some of the meal which it feeds upon, and make it into paste with...
Page 193 - ... for building purposes. No vestige of timber was found, though there was abundance of wood charcoal in the lower strata, apparently of a small scrubby underwood of birch and hazel. The remarkable fact in this mound is, that it indicated successive occupation, and adaptation of the older parts of the building by newer inhabitants. The primitive part of the structure seemed to be the second or middle circular wall, which was by far the most massively built, and went down to a lower pavement of large...
Page 265 - In this stone trough,1 which lies in the open churchyard, they are fastened down to a wooden framework, and there left for a whole night with a covering of hay over them, and St. Fillan's bell is put upon their heads.
Page 97 - The conclusion I have therefore come to is, that there was no connection between the stone at Scone and the Lia fail at Tara, and that the legends of their wanderings, like those of the tribes with whom they are associated, are nothing but myth and fable.
Page 422 - The roof had given way about the middle of the gallery, and blocked up the whole width of it to the roof. On removing this, and when the end came in view, it was seen that the flint had been worked out in three places, at the end, forming three hollows extending beyond the chalk face of the end of the gallery.
Page 265 - It usually lay on a grave-stone in the Church-yard. When mad people were brought to be dipped in the Saint's Pool, it was necessary to perform certain ceremonies, in which there was a mixture of Druidism and Popery. After remaining all night in the Chapel, bound with ropes, the bell was set upon their head with great solemnity. It was the popular opinion that, if stolen, it would extricate itself out of the thief's hands, and return home, ringing all the way." It is added: "For some years past this...
Page 79 - King of Egypt, with an armed band, and a large fleet, goes to Ireland, and there being joined by a body of Irish, she sails to Scotland, taking with her the royal seat, which he, the King of England, with other insignia of the Kingdom of Scotland, carried with him, by violence, to England.

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