Reflections on an Ageless Wisdom: A Commentary on The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett

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Quest Books, Jul 13, 2010 - Religion - 750 pages
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Modern Theosophy expresses the ancient wisdom tradition found in all religions. When H. P. Blavatsky, founder of the Theosophical Society in 1875, told English journalist A. P. Sinnett she had gained her paranormal knowledge from more evolved beings called the Mahatmas, Sinnett asked to communicate with them himself. The result was a remarkable correspondence carried on from 1880 to 1885 with Mahatmas Khoot Hoomi and Morya. Recorded in The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett, the answers of these Teachers form an essential part of Theosophical literature. At the time, the Letters stormed the bastions of racial and religious prejudice, and they continue to fascinate those seeking to probe the mysteries of the universe and the nature of consciousness. Here is the most comprehensive, magisterial discussion of The Mahatma Letters since they were first published in 1924. Eminent Theosophist Joy Mills bases her commentary on Vincente Hao Chin’s 1999 edition of the Letters, helpfully arranged chronologically to enable following the exposition as it originally unfolded. Mills quotes Sinnett in emphasizing that the Mahatmas’ purpose was not to put the world into possession of occult knowledge but to train those who proved qualified . . . so that they might ascend the path of spiritual progress. Her focus, then, is on not only knowledge of the magnificent Occult Science but more significantly the ethical and moral values we must embrace to be of service to the world. She offers her reflections on over 140 letters in the hope that they may prove useful to fellow-students on the journey toward the spiritual heights. May these letters call you as they have continued to call me to keep on exploring, for truly there is no other way to go!
  

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Contents

Commentary on The Lett ers
1
Conclusion
537
Bibliography
539

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About the author (2010)

Joy Mills, a teacher by profession, has devoted most of her adult life to the work of The Theosophical Society. Joining the society in 1940, she has served in a number of capacities, including that of National President of both the American and Australian Sections of the society, as well as International Vice-President. Her lecture tours have taken her to more than 50 countries and society branches. She has published several books, including a history of the American section, 100 Years of Theosophy, and her writings have been published in theosophical journals throughout the world. Mills holds a bachelors degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a master's in English Literature from the University of Chicago. She engaged in further post-graduate studies in American History at the University of Washington. During a seven-year period, she was a high school teacher in the Seattle Public Schools system. Elected to the office of National President of the Theosophical Society in America in 1965, the first woman to serve in that capacity, Mills was re-elected for three successive terms. During that period, she founded Quest Books as well as a number of other programs supported by grants from the Kern Foundation. Resigning office in 1974, when she was appointed the society's international vice-president, Mills took up residence at the world headquarters in Chennai, India, continuing to tour and lecture throughout the world. Returning to the States in 1980, Mills became Director of the Krotona Institute School of Theosophy, greatly expanding its educational and training programs. Called to accept the office of National President of the Society in Australia, Mills resided there for three years. Returning to her home in Ojai, CA, Mills continues to teach at the Krotona School and also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Krotona Institute. Mills continues as a member of the international society's General Council, its governing body, and has made frequent trips to its Indian headquarters. Now in semi-retirement, she devotes most of her time to writing while still presenting some classes at Krotona.

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