The Vegetable kingdom ; or, The structure, classification, and uses of plants (Google eBook)

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Bradbury & Evans, 1853 - Botany - 984 pages
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Page 38 - So very exciting to the nervous system hi many individuals is this Fungus, that the effects are often very ludicrous. If a person under its influence wishes to step over a straw or small stick, he takes a stride or a jump sufficient to clear the trunk of a tree ; a talkative person cannot keep silence or secrets ; and one fond of music is perpetually singing.
Page 261 - One of the leaves slightly touched the first three fingers of my left hand : at the time I only perceived a slight pricking, to which I paid no attention. This was at seven in the morning. The pain continued to increase ; in an hour it had become intolerable ; it seemed as if some one was rubbing my fingers with a hot iron. Nevertheless, there was no remarkable appearance ; neither swelling, nor pustule, nor inflammation. The pain...
Page 38 - They are collected in the hottest months, and hung up by a string hi the air to dry ; some dry of themselves on the ground, and are said to be far more narcotic than those artificially preserved. Small deep-coloured specimens, thickly covered with warts, are also said to be more powerful than those of a larger size and paler colour.
Page 261 - Leschenault) slightly touched the first three fingers of my left hand: at the time I only perceived a slight pricking, to which I paid no attention. This was at seven in the morning. The pain continued to increase ; in an hour it had become intolerable : it seemed as if some one was rubbing my fingers with a hot iron. Nevertheless there was no remarkable appearance ; neither swelling, nor pustule, nor inflammation. The pain rapidly spread along the arm as far as the armpit. I was then seized with...
Page 138 - ... as it acquires solidity, till at last it is almost as hard as ivory. The liquor contained in the young fruits becomes acid if they are cut from the tree and kept some time. From the kernels the Indians fashion the knobs of walking-sticks, the reels of spindles, and little toys, which are whiter than ivory, and as hard, if they are not put under water ; and if they are, they become white and hard again when dried. Bears devour the young fruit with avidity.
Page 38 - Small deep-coloured specimens, thickly covered with warts, are also said to be more powerful than those of a larger size and paler colour. The usual mode of taking the Fungus is, to roll it up like a bolus, and swallow it without chewing, which, the Kamchatkadales say, would disorder the stomach.
Page 38 - It renders some remarkably active, and proves highly stimulant to muscular exertion : by too large a dose, violent spasmodic effects are produced. So very exciting to the nervous system in many individuals, is this Fungus, that the effects are often very ludicrous. If a person under its influence wishes to step over a straw or...
Page 33 - In their simplest form they are little articulated filaments, composed of simple cellules placed end to end ; such 'is the mouldiness that is found upon various substances, the mildew of the Rose-bush, and, in short, all the tribes of Mucor and Mucedo ; in some of these the joints disarticulate, and appear to be capable of reproduction ; in others sporules collect in the terminal joints, and are finally dispersed by the rupture of the cellule that contained them.
Page xii - Its object is to give a concise view of the state of Systematical Botany at the present day, to show the relation or supposed relation of one group of plants to another, to explain their geographical distribution, and to point out the various uses to which the species are applied in different countries.
Page 111 - ... the countries of the East, Persia, northern India, Arabia, Egypt, Nubia, Barbary, and the Canary Islands ; in these latter countries, however, the culture of maize or rice, towards the south, is always more considerable, and in some of them several kinds of Sorghum (Doura) and Poa Abyssinica come to be added.

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