The Border Settlers of Northwestern Virginia, from 1768 to 1795: Embracing the Life of Jesse Hughes and Other Noted Scouts of the Great Woods of the Trans-Allegheny : with Notes and Illustrative Anecdotes (Google eBook)

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Genealogical Publishing Com, 1915 - History - 509 pages
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Contents

CHAPTER I
31
CHAPTER II
40
CHAPTER III
52
CHAPTER IV
57
CHAPTER V
67
CHAPTER VI
75
CHAPTER VII
86
CHAPTER IX
95
CHAPTER XXII
216
CHAPTER XXIII
220
CHAPTER XXIV
226
CHAPTER XXV
234
CHAPTER XXVI
246
CHAPTER XXVII
263
CHAPTER XXVIII
274
CHAPTER XXIX
296

CHAPTER X
103
CHAPTER XI
121
CHAPTER XII
133
CHAPTER XIII
147
CHAPTER XIV
157
CHAPTER XV
162
CHAPTER XVI
167
CHAPTER XVII
177
CHAPTER XVIII
190
CHAPTER XIX
197
CHAPTER XX
205
CHAPTER XXI
211
CHAPTER XXX
309
CHAPTER XXXI
314
CHAPTER XXXII
324
CHAPTER XXXIII
333
CHAPTER XXXIV
338
CHAPTER XXXV
342
APPENDIX I
357
APPENDIX II
377
APPENDIX III
388
APPENDIX IV
408
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Page 56 - No you won't, said the boy, 'it is my turkey; I heard it first.' 'Well,' said Hughes, 'but you know I am the best shot. I'll go and kill it, and give you the turkey.' The lad demurred but at length agreed. Hughes went out of the fort on the side that was farthest from the supposed turkey, and passing along the river, went up a ravine and cautiously creeping through the bushes behind...
Page 37 - Those who had commenced clearing land, were supplied by them with abundance of meat, while in their hunting excursions through the country a better knowledge of it was obtained than could have been acquired had they been engaged in making improvements. In one of these expeditions, they discovered and gave name to Stone-coal creek, which, flowing westwardly, induced the supposition that it discharged itself directly into the Ohio. Descending this creek, to ascertain the fact, they came to its confluence...

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About the author (1915)

Mourning Dove, the author of "Cogewea," was an Okanogan of eastern Washington. She lived as a migrant farmworker and, after ten-hour days in the hop fields and apple orchards, faithfully returned to the battered typewriter in her tent. Lucullus Virgil McWhorter, a respected and sympathetic student of Indian lore and history, encouraged her in her ambition to be a writer; finally she made her book a record of the folklore of the Okanogan tribe, a plea for the welfare of the half-blood, and above all the testimony to her own singleminded dedication.

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