A History of American Privateers (Google eBook)

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Digital Antiquaria, Apr 1, 2004 - History - 408 pages
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"Affair of the Margaretta" "Subsequent careers of Jeremiah and John O'Brien"

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 21 - The public will learn, with sentiments which we shall not presume to anticipate, that a third British frigate has struck to an American. This is an occurrence that calls for serious reflection, — this, and the fact stated in our paper of yesterday, that Lloyd's list contains notices of upwards of five hundred British vessels captured in seven months by the Americans.
Page 21 - Any one who had predicted such a result of an American war this time last year would have ^^ been treated as a madman or a traitor. He would have been told, if his opponents had condescended to argue with him, that long ere seven months had elapsed the American...
Page 61 - Mr. Brown immediately resolved on her destruction; and he forthwith directed one of his trusty ship-masters to collect eight of the largest long-boats in the harbor, with five oars to each, to have the oars and rowlocks well muffled, to prevent noise, and to place them at Fenner's Wharf, directly opposite the dwelling of Mr.
Page 61 - Point, and would not float off until three o'clock, the next morning; and inviting those persons who felt a disposition to go and destroy that troublesome vessel, to repair in the evening to Mr. James Sabin's house. About nine o'clock, I took my father's gun, and my powder horn and bullets, and went to Mr.
Page 21 - America, and have failed; nay, that we have retired from the combat with the stripes yet bleeding on our backs. Even yet, however, if we could but close the war with some great naval triumph, the reputation of our maritime greatness might be partially restored. But to say that it has not hitherto suffered in the estimation of all Europe, and, what is worse, of America herself, is to belie common sense and universal experience. 'Two or three of our ships have struck to a force vastly inferior...
Page 18 - ... declared the whole American coast under blockade, it is equally distressing and mortifying that our ships cannot, with safety, traverse our own Channels ; that insurance cannot be effected but at an excessive premium ; and that a horde of American cruisers should be allowed, unheeded...
Page 61 - I loaded my gun, and all remained there till about ten o'clock, some casting bullets in the kitchen, and others making arrangements for departure, when orders were given to cross the street to Fenner's Wharf, and embark; which soon took place, and a sea captain acted as steersman of each boat; of whom, I recollect Capt.

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