More Mathematical Puzzles of Sam Loyd, Volume 2

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Courier Corporation, 1960 - Games - 177 pages
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Gardner's second collection of amusing, thought-provoking problems and puzzles from Loyd's Cyclopedia perhaps the most exciting collection of puzzles ever assembled in one volume. Arithmetic, algebra, speed and distance problems, game theory, counter and sliding block problems, similar topics. 166 problems. 150 original drawings, diagrams.
  

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Contents

Arithmetic and Algebraic Problems
1
The Hidden Couplet 54
2
Geometrical Dissection Problems
3
Speed and Distance Problems
8
Clock Problems
10
Contracting Costs
15
Puzzleland Gingerbread
20
Tom the Pipers Son
21
Trading Lots Puzzle
59
How Old Is the Boy?
62
Red Cross Volunteers
66
CrossCountry Running
67
How Large Was the Farm?
75
The Diamond Thief
77
Chick to Egg
81
William Tell in Puzzleland
88

Plane Geometry Problems
27
A Puzzle in Oil and Vinegar
28
Against the Wind
34
The Crusaders
36
The Weight of a Brick
41
Puzzling Prattle
49
Peaches Pears Persimmons and Plums
50
Sawing the Checkerboard
51
Disputed Claims
89
Christophers Egg Tricks
93
A Swiss Puzzle
101
The Courier Problem
103
The Jolly Friars Puzzle
109
Caseys Cow
117
Physics and Calculus Problems
171
Copyright

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About the author (1960)

Martin Gardner was a renowned author who published over 70 books on subjects from science and math to poetry and religion. He also had a lifelong passion for magic tricks and puzzles. Well known for his mathematical games column in Scientific American and his "Trick of the Month" in Physics Teacher magazine, Gardner attracted a loyal following with his intelligence, wit, and imagination.

Martin Gardner: A Remembrance
The worldwide mathematical community was saddened by the death of Martin Gardner on May 22, 2010. Martin was 95 years old when he died, and had written 70 or 80 books during his long lifetime as an author. Martin's first Dover books were published in 1956 and 1957: Mathematics, Magic and Mystery, one of the first popular books on the intellectual excitement of mathematics to reach a wide audience, and Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science, certainly one of the first popular books to cast a devastatingly skeptical eye on the claims of pseudoscience and the many guises in which the modern world has given rise to it. Both of these pioneering books are still in print with Dover today along with more than a dozen other titles of Martin's books. They run the gamut from his elementary Codes, Ciphers and Secret Writing, which has been enjoyed by generations of younger readers since the 1980s, to the more demanding The New Ambidextrous Universe: Symmetry and Asymmetry from Mirror Reflections to Superstrings, which Dover published in its final revised form in 2005.

To those of us who have been associated with Dover for a long time, however, Martin was more than an author, albeit a remarkably popular and successful one. As a member of the small group of long-time advisors and consultants, which included NYU's Morris Kline in mathematics, Harvard's I. Bernard Cohen in the history of science, and MIT's J. P. Den Hartog in engineering, Martin's advice and editorial suggestions in the formative 1950s helped to define the Dover publishing program and give it the point of view which despite many changes, new directions, and the consequences of evolution continues to be operative today.

In the Author's Own Words:
"Politicians, real-estate agents, used-car salesmen, and advertising copy-writers are expected to stretch facts in self-serving directions, but scientists who falsify their results are regarded by their peers as committing an inexcusable crime. Yet the sad fact is that the history of science swarms with cases of outright fakery and instances of scientists who unconsciously distorted their work by seeing it through lenses of passionately held beliefs."

"A surprising proportion of mathematicians are accomplished musicians. Is it because music and mathematics share patterns that are beautiful?" Martin Gardner

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