Garner on Language and Writing

Front Cover
American Bar Association, 2009 - Law - 839 pages
14 Reviews
Since the 1987 appearance of A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage, Bryan A. Garner has proved to be a versatile and prolific writer on legal-linguistic subjects. This collection of his essays shows both profound scholarship and sharp wit. The essays cover subjects as wide-ranging as learning to write, style, persuasion, contractual and legislative drafting, grammar, lexicography, writing in law school, writing in law practice, judicial writing, and all the literature relating to these diverse subjects.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
9
3 stars
0
2 stars
1
1 star
0

This book made me realize that I'm a poor writer. - Goodreads
I like Garner's writing style and I enjoyed his essays. - Goodreads
Garner's focus is on improving legal writing. - Goodreads
On Language and Writing” is a great addition for me. - Goodreads
Second, it is a book of essays, not a reference. - LibraryThing
Miss Phillips refused to look at the reference. - LibraryThing

Review: Garner on Language and Writing: Selected Essays and Speeches of Bryan A. Garner

User Review  - John Heyhoe-Griffiths - Goodreads

This book made me realize that I'm a poor writer. I suppose that's the highest compliment I can give the book. But despite that depressing realization, I enjoyed this collection of articles and essays ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Athenable - LibraryThing

I've won a copy on First Reads. Language is my passion, so I hope to enjoy the book. Read full review

Contents

Learning to Write
3
From Mush to Masterpiece
8
The Stuttering Writer
12
The Importance of Attentive Reading
15
Telling the Good from the Bad
18
Finding Good Models of Writing
21
The Third and Fourth Levels of Competence
24
The Benefits of Keeping a Daily Journal
27
Introduction to Burns New Law Dictionary 1792
372
Introduction to Williamss Law Dictionary 1816
373
Introduction to Bouviers Law Dictionary 1857
375
Writing in Law School
379
Taking a Lesson from Tiger Woods
382
How Serious Is Your School About Writing?
385
Why Students Should Support LRW Classes
389
The Art of Briefing Cases
392

Why You Should Start a Writing Group
31
Style
37
On Legal Style
47
In Praise of Simplicity
49
Putting the Action in Your Verbs and Your Verbs in Active Voice
51
Colloquiality in Law
55
Judges on Effective Writing
57
On Conjunctions as SentenceStarters
63
Genteelisms Officialese and Commercialese
88
The Aesthetics of Your Pages
98
Persuasive Writing
105
The Three Parts of a Brief
108
The Upshot of It All
114
A New Approach to Framing Legal Questions
120
The Language of Appellate Advocacy
149
Grasping Your Nettles
158
Debriefing Your Briefs
161
Legal Drafting
167
Legislative Drafting
169
Handling Words of Authority
174
Purging the Dirty Dozen
180
The Abstemious Definer
185
The Drafters Machete for Slashing Through Density
190
James Fitzjames Stephen as Drafter and Lexicographer
195
English Grammar and Usage
211
The Word on the Street
215
Testing Your Command of Grammar and Usage
217
Our Blundering Law Reviews
222
Gauging Your Editing Skills
227
BooBoos in Our Law Reviews
232
Words Words Wordsand Race
236
Transcending Dialect
239
Nonsexist Language and Credibility
243
WordKarma
245
Preface to A Dictionary of Modern American Usage
246
A Texan Fowler? Answering the Critics of Modern American Usage
255
Making Peace in the Language Wars
266
Legal Language
289
Plain Language
293
Legalese
302
Reworking Your Vocabulary
304
Steeling Yourself Against Legalese
308
Terms of Art
311
Doublets Triplets and SynonymStrings
313
A Grammatical Grotesquerie in Texas Practice
318
Going Hence Without Day
320
The Lawyers imply
323
Novelties in Lawyer Talk
327
Legal Lexicography
335
The Missing CommonLaw Words
340
Preface to the First Pocket Edition of Blacks Law Dictionary
351
Preface to the Seventh Edition of Black s Law Dictionary
354
Preface to A Handbook of Family Law Terms
362
Preface to Rastells Exposition of Certain Difficult and Obscure Wordes 1579
365
Introduction to Cunninghams New and Complete LawDictionary 3d ed 1783
367
Writing in Practice
399
Why IRAC Is Good for Exams but Bad in Practice
402
Ten Tips for Writing at Your Law Firm
405
Demand Letters That Get Results
409
The Importance of Other Eyes
415
Planning an InHouse Writing Workshop?
418
Judicial Writing
427
The Style of US Supreme Court Opinions
439
Clearing the Cobwebs from Judicial Opinions
448
Citations
471
The Place for Bibliographic Numbers
472
The Citational Footnote
475
The Great Style Debate
484
The Maroonbook Blues
487
Bizarreries
493
On Pun Control
497
Cruel and Unusual English
499
More on Peccant Punning
504
Lapsus Memoriae
506
Testamentary Depositions and Other Curiosities
509
Insane Committees
511
Alliteritis
512
Sesquipedality
513
Smelling of the Inkhorn
519
One Bite
525
Pronunciations Scofflaws
526
An Epistolary Essay
529
Tributes and Autobiographical Essays
543
The Legend and the Man
563
Remembering Judge Thomas Gibbs Gee
566
Sir Robert Megarry RIP
572
Finding the Right Words
574
How I Stumbled on a Literary Treasure
578
Interviews
587
From The Record
593
From Copy Editor
599
Book Recommendations
609
Sources for Answering Questions of Grammar and Usage
613
Is Law a Literary Profession?
618
Book Reviews
623
Harmless Drudgery?
627
Not Your Fathers Fowler
633
Dont Know Much About Punctuation
637
Conjugational Infidelity
648
Dialect of the Web Tribe
651
Chronicles of Grammar Usage and Writing
657
2005
664
2006
674
2007
688
The Last Word
705
Recommended Sources on Language and Writing
709
Table of Cases Cited
749
Index
757
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Bryan A. Garner is president of LawProse, Inc., and Distinguished Research Professor of Law at Southern Methodist University. The editor-in-chief of "Black's Law Dictionary", Garner is the author of several best-selling books, including "Garner's""Modern American Usage" and, with Justice Antonin Scalia, "Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts" and "Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges".

Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been an associate justice of the Supreme Court since 1993.

Bibliographic information