Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace... One School at a Time

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Viking, 2007 - Girls' schools - 349 pages
2136 Reviews
The astonishing, uplifting story of a real-life Indiana Jones and his humanitarian campaign to use education to combat terrorism in the Taliban's backyard Anyone who despairs of the individual's power to change lives has to read the story of Greg Mortenson, a homeless mountaineer who, following a 1993 climb of Pakistan's treacherous K2, was inspired by a chance encounter with impoverished mountain villagers and promised to build them a school. Over the next decade he built fifty-five schools - especially for girls - that offer a balanced education in one of the most isolated and dangerous regions on earth. As it chronicles Mortenson's quest, which has brought him into conflict with both enraged Islamists and uncomprehending Americans, Three Cups of Tea combines adventure with a celebration of the humanitarian spirit.

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Amazing story telling. - LibraryThing
Great story, BUT... poor writing and lots of typos! - LibraryThing
I loved this book despite flaws in the prose. - LibraryThing
The writing was very bogged down with flashbacks. - LibraryThing
It is very educational and inspiring. - LibraryThing
This book helped me to gain some insight into this. - LibraryThing

Review: Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace ... One School at a Time

User Review  - Deborah Lee - Goodreads

Greg Mortenson was my personal hero for so long. Even though I have been greatly disappointed by allegations of questionable finances in his foundation (though no proof to date of which I am aware), this book is a worthy read. Read full review

Review: Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace ... One School at a Time

User Review  - Adriane Devries - Goodreads

“Trust in Allah, but tie up your camel.” –graffiti in Skardu, Pakistan After a failed attempt to summit K2 in the Karakoram mountain range, American climber Greg Mortenson added insult to injury by ... Read full review

About the author (2007)

Greg Mortenson was born in 1957 in St. Cloud, Minnesota. From 1958 - 1973, he lived on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania where his father, Dempsey, co-founded the teaching hospital, Kilimanjaro Christian medical Center (KCMC), and where his mother, Jerene, founded the International School Moshi. After serving in the U.S. Army in Germany from 1977 - 1979, Mortenson graduated from the University of South Dakota in 1983 with an Associate Degree in Nursing and a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry. He is the co-founder of the nonprofit Central Asia Institute and founder of Pennies for Peace, and is the co-author of the #1 New York Times best-seller, Three Cups of Tea, which has won several awards including Time Magazine's Asia Book of the Year. Mortenson is a humanitarian and has dedicated his life to promote education, especially for girls, in remote regions of Pakistan and Afghanistan, where he has established over 78 schools. In 2009, Pakistan's government awarded Mortenson Pakistan's highest civil award, the Sitara-e-Pakistan ("Star of Pakistan"). Mortenson has received many other awards including National Award for Citizen Diplomacy in 2008, Rotary International Paul Harris Award in 2007, and Red Cross (Montana) "Humanitarian of the Year" in 2005. As of 2009, Mortenson has also received 10 honorary doctorates. Mortenson is married to Dr. Tara Bishop, a clinical psychologist. They have two children.

David Oliver Relin was born in Rochester, New York on December 12, 1962. He graduated from Vassar College in 1985, and was later awarded a fellowship at the Iowa Writers' Workshop. In the 1990s, he established himself as a journalist with an interest in telling stories about people in need including articles about child soldiers and about his travels in Vietnam. He was the co-author of Three Cups of Tea with Greg Mortenson, which was published in 2006. In 2011, basic facts in the book were questioned by author Jon Krakauer and the CBS News program 60 Minutes. 60 Minutes also discovered that Mortenson's charity was spending large amounts of money on Mortenson's personal expenses and to promote the book. This caused Relin to suffer both emotionally and financially. He did not speak publicly about the charges, but he hired a lawyer to defend himself in a federal lawsuit that accused the authors and the publisher of defrauding readers. The suit was dismissed in 2012. He suffered from depression and committed suicide on November 15, 2012 at the age of 49. His book Second Suns: Two Doctors and Their Amazing Quest to Restore Sight and Save Lives was published in 2013 after his death.

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