Dialectology

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 10, 1998 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 201 pages
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When first published in 1980, Dialectology broke new ground by integrating urban dialectology (sociolinguistics), dialect geography and spatial variation into a cohesive discipline. In this second edition, the authors take account of the renaissance of dialect research in the last twenty years. They offer new sections on dialectometry and mapping variability, a revised section on dialect geography as well as updates of other recent developments. A reliable textbook for over seventeen years, this new edition will continue to serve the needs of undergraduates and individual scholars with its comprehensive coverage of methods, models and findings in the study of language variation and change.
  

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Review: Dialectology (Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics)

User Review  - Katja - Goodreads

A well-organized survey with good pointers, highly informative for its length of only 190 pages. The first edition appeared in 1980 when the interest in dialectology revived, the second edition is 13 ... Read full review

Contents

Dialect and language
3
12 Language dialect and accent
4
13 Geographical dialect continua
5
14 Social dialect continua
7
15 Autonomy and heteronomy
9
16 Discreteness and continuity
12
Dialect geography
13
22 An outline history of dialect geography
15
75 Cultural correlates of isoglosses
100
76 Isoglosses and dialect variation
103
Transitions
104
82 Introduction to the variables
105
83 The transition zone for u
106
84 Mixed and fudged lects
110
85 The variable a
113
86 Transitions in general
118

23 The methods of dialect geography
21
232 Linguistic maps
25
233 The selection of informants
29
Further information
31
Dialectology and linguistics
32
32 Structural dialectology
33
321 Inventory distribution and incidence
36
322 Lexical correspondences
37
33 Generative dialectology
39
34 Polylectal grammars
42
Further information
44
Urban dialectology
45
43 Representativeness
47
44 Obtaining data
48
45 Classifying informants
49
Further information
53
SOCIAL VARIATION
55
Social differentiation and language
57
52 Stylistic differentiation
59
53 Sex differentiation
61
54 Other aspects of social differentiation in language
63
542 Social networks
64
543 Individual characteristics
67
Further information
68
Sociolinguistic structure and linguistic innovation
70
611 Overt stigmatisation
72
613 Phonological contrast
73
614 Stereotypes
75
62 The study of linguistic change
76
621 Patterns of age differentiation
78
63 Mechanisms of linguistic change
81
631 Stylistic variation
82
632 The role of sex
83
633 Covert prestige
85
Further information
86
SPATIAL VARIATION
87
Boundarie
89
72 Patterns of isoglosses
91
722 Transitions
93
723 Relic areas
94
74 Grading of isoglosses
96
871 A relic feature in the west midlands
119
872 The interplay of social and geographical variation
120
873 Mapping social variation directly
121
Further information
123
MECHANISMS OF VARIATION
125
Variability
127
911 Variability as accidental
128
913 Variable constraints
130
92 Implicational scales
131
921 Default singulars in Alabama
132
922 CC in northern England
133
93 Handling quantitative data
135
94 Quantifying geographic variables
136
941 Dialectometry
137
942 Multidimensional scaling
140
943 A transition zone in Ohio
142
944 Correspondence analysis of the matrix
144
945 Linguistic distance and geographic distance
147
Further information
148
Diffusion sociolinguistic and lexical
149
IO11 Agegraded changes
151
102 Innovators of change
153
1022 A sexbased innovation in Belfast
155
1023 An agebased innovation in the Golden Horseshoe
157
103 Lexical diffusion
159
Further information
165
Diffusion geographical
166
111 Spatial diffusion of language
167
113 Linguistic areas
168
114 Uvular r in Europe
170
115 Diffusion down the urban hierarchy
172
116 Cartographical representation of spatial diffusion
176
1161 The Norwegian studv
177
117 Explanations in sociolinguistic dialect geography
178
118 Further refinements to the model
185
Further information
186
Cohesion in dialectology
187
Further information
189
REFERENCES
190
INDEX
198
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About the author (1998)

J. K. Chambers is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Toronto. He is the author of "Sociolinguistic Theory: Language Variation and Its Social Significance" (second edition, Blackwell 2003), and co-author with Peter Trudgill of "Dialectology" (second edition, 1998), as well as other books and scores of articles.


Peter Trudgill is Chair of English Linguistics at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. He is author of "Sociolinguistics: An Introduction to Language and Society" (1996), and "Dialects of England" (second edition, Blackwell 1999), and co-editor with Laurie Bauer of "Language Myths" (1999). He is editor of Blackwell's Language in Society series.

Natalie Schilling-Estes is Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown University. She is co-author of "Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks: The Story of the Ocracoke Brogue" (1997) and "American English" (Blackwell 1998), both with Walt Wolfram.

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