Prelude to Quebec's Quiet Revolution: Liberalism vs Neo-Nationalism, 1945-60 (Google eBook)

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Jun 1, 1985 - History - 400 pages
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Two competing movements emerged in the 1940s to challenge the traditional ideology. One espoused neo-nationalism, the other liberalism. Both were made up of young, dedicated intellectuals and journalists; together they represent the ideological roots of Quebec's Quiet Revolution.
  

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excellent bouquin

Contents

Introduction
3
1 Quebec in Transition
8
The Formative Years
20
3 The Neonationalist Critique of Nationalism
37
4 Cité libre and the Revolution of Mentalities
61
5 Cité libre and Nationalism
84
6 The Nationalist versus the Liberal State
97
7 The Role of Organized Labour
121
9 Quebec Confronts the New Federalism
185
Democratizing a Political Culture
220
11 Ideologues in Search of a Political Party
239
Conclusion
271
Notes
277
Bibliography
337
Index
355
Copyright

Key to National Survival or Prerequisite for Democracy?
149

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Page 16 - The collective role of this new middle class is to be the improvised agent of an "administrative revolution," and this administrative revolution constitutes a new basis for the accrued power of the traditional elites. Their claim is being honoured without any major dissent. I should now like to show how this new society is emerging. The rejuvenation of the traditional elites can only be accounted for by as neat a set of converging interests of clergy, political parties, and foreign capitalists as...
Page 16 - ... about the emerging shape of the new society is that the traditional elites are still the commanding ones in FrenchCanadian society. While the changes wrought by massive industrialization could have considerably altered the composition of the power structure at the top levels, they have not done so. The decisive importance of the clergy and its ascendancy over the French-Canadian political and commercial spheres have not decreased in the transition from the rural to the industrial society. Quite...

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About the author (1985)

University of Ottawa

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