Kim (Google eBook)

Front Cover
NuVision Publications, LLC, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
21 Reviews
Kim is Kimball O'Hara, a white Irish boy, whose father was a soldier in the Irish regiment stationed in Lahore, India. Kim was orphaned and grew up on the streets of Lahore. He is being looked after by a half-caste woman who is, in all probability, a prostitute. His skin is burnt black, and he lives like a low-caste Hindu street delinquent. He never learned to read or write or speak English very well but is streetsmart and perceptive and has given up a normal life with his recruitment as a spy in the British Secret Service. The story begins when Kim meets an old Tibetan, Teshoo lama, who wanders into Lahore to look for Buddhist artifacts which might be useful to him as he searches to find the river which resulted from an arrow shot by Buddha and which washes away sin, but the location is undisclosed. Because both are in search of their identities, they join together in their journey. Kim assumes the role of the lama's disciple which gives him an excuse to travel across India and also provides him with a perfect cover for his purpose as a spy. He becomes the lama's protector and guide in the snarling hustle and bustle of Indian life which is strange and unknown to the lama. He helps the lama find shelter and begs for their food and allows the lama to lean on his shoulder as they walk. The lama also aids Kim with emotional and spiritual support while being sustained by Kim's youthful energy and strength. They travel the plains south to Benares and onward to the Himalayas at the very edge of India, and here their spectacular pilgrimage comes to an end. The qualities Kim and the lama have in common allow them to unite their capabilities as a solution to their personal explorations. They have no family; they have no recognition of possession; both have surrendered a regular life to their quests; both expeditions are beyond the effort of ordinary people. Their crusade takes four years and ends with an unmistakable awareness of their destin
  

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Review: Kim

User Review  - Monthly Book Group - Goodreads

Kim (Kipling's masterpiece) came as a very pleasant surprise to those who came new to Kipling. It was a subtle, engaging, comic and moving tale of a young man's development, set against a gorgeous ... Read full review

Review: Kim

User Review  - Keely - Goodreads

As I said of another classic adventure story of The Great Game, the East is a fantasy. This is not only true for writers like Mundy, who experienced it as an outsider, or Howard, who experienced it ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter 1
7
Chapter 2
23
Chapter 3
33
Chapter 4
43
Chapter 5
55
Chapter 6
67
Chapter 7
79
Chapter 8
89
Chapter 9
99
Chapter 10
113
Chapter 11
125
Chapter 12
139
Chapter 13
153
Chapter 14
167
Chapter 15
177
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Kipling, who as a novelist dramatized the ambivalence of the British colonial experience, was born of English parents in Bombay and as a child knew Hindustani better than English. He spent an unhappy period of exile from his parents (and the Indian heat) with a harsh aunt in England, followed by the public schooling that inspired his "Stalky" stories. He returned to India at 18 to work on the staff of the Lahore Civil and Military Gazette and rapidly became a prolific writer. His mildly satirical work won him a reputation in England, and he returned there in 1889. Shortly after, his first novel, The Light That Failed (1890) was published, but it was not altogether successful. In the early 1890s, Kipling met and married Caroline Balestier and moved with her to her family's estate in Brattleboro, Vermont. While there he wrote Many Inventions (1893), The Jungle Book (1894-95), and Captains Courageous (1897). He became dissatisfied with life in America, however, and moved back to England, returning to America only when his daughter died of pneumonia. Kipling never again returned to the United States, despite his great popularity there. Short stories form the greater portion of Kipling's work and are of several distinct types. Some of his best are stories of the supernatural, the eerie and unearthly, such as "The Phantom Rickshaw," "The Brushwood Boy," and "They." His tales of gruesome horror include "The Mark of the Beast" and "The Return of Imray." "William the Conqueror" and "The Head of the District" are among his political tales of English rule in India. The "Soldiers Three" group deals with Kipling's three musketeers: an Irishman, a Cockney, and a Yorkshireman. The Anglo-Indian Tales, of social life in Simla, make up the larger part of his first four books. Kipling wrote equally well for children and adults. His best-known children's books are Just So Stories (1902), The Jungle Books (1894-95), and Kim (1901). His short stories, although their understanding of the Indian is often moving, became minor hymns to the glory of Queen Victoria's empire and the civil servants and soldiers who staffed her outposts. Kim, an Irish boy in India who becomes the companion of a Tibetan lama, at length joins the British Secret Service, without, says Wilson, any sense of the betrayal of his friend this actually meant. Nevertheless, Kipling has left a vivid panorama of the India of his day. In 1907, Kipling became England's first Nobel Prize winner in literature and the only nineteenth-century English poet to win the Prize. He won not only on the basis of his short stories, which more closely mirror the ambiguities of the declining Edwardian world than has commonly been recognized, but also on the basis of his tremendous ability as a popular poet. His reputation was first made with Barrack Room Ballads (1892), and in "Recessional" he captured a side of Queen Victoria's final jubilee that no one else dared to address.

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