Origins of the Kabbalah

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Princeton University Press, 1990 - History - 487 pages
4 Reviews

One of the most important scholars of our century, Gershom Scholem (1897-1982) opened up a once esoteric world of Jewish mysticism, the Kabbalah, to concerned students of religion. The Kabbalah is a rich tradition of repeated attempts to achieve and portray direct experiences of God: its twelfth-and thirteenth-century beginnings in southern France and Spain are probed in Origins of the Kabbalah, a work crucial in Scholem's oeuvre. The book is a contribution not only to the history of Jewish medieval mysticism but also to the study of medieval mysticism in general and will be of interest to historians and psychologists, as well as to students of the history of religion.

  

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Scholem is probably the best Read full review

Review: Origins of the Kabbalah

User Review  - Goodreads

Scholem is probably the best Read full review

Contents

IV
3
V
12
VI
18
VII
24
VIII
35
IX
49
X
68
XI
81
XXI
227
XXII
248
XXIII
261
XXIV
289
XXV
299
XXVI
309
XXVII
331
XXVIII
347

XII
97
XIII
123
XIV
138
XV
151
XVI
162
XVII
180
XVIII
188
XIX
199
XX
205
XXIX
355
XXX
365
XXXI
393
XXXII
414
XXXIII
430
XXXIV
454
XXXV
460
XXXVI
477
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About the author (1990)

Gershom Scholem was a professor of Jewish mysticism at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem until his death in 1982. Among his most important works are "Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism, The Messianic Idea in Judaism," and "On the Kabbalah and Its Symbolism.

R. J. Zei Werlbonsky is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Religion at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

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