The Princess Casamassima (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
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"The Princess Casamassima" is a psychologically probing novel by Henry James about the politics and social inequalities of 19th century London. It is the story of Hyacinth Robinson, the intelligent and impoverished young bookbinder, who finds himself caught up in a world of radical politics and revolution, conflicted between a newfound world of beauty, wealth and refinement, and the honor of upholding his vows. Henry James (1843-1916) was an American-born English writer whose novels, short stories and letters established the foundation of the modernist movement in twentieth century fiction and poetry. His career, one of the most significant and influential in English literature, spanned over five decades and resulted in a body of work that has had a profound impact on generations of writers. Born in New York, but educated in France, Germany, England and Switzerland, James often explored the cultural discord between the Old World (Europe) and the New World (United States) in his writings.
  

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Contents

BOOK FIRST
3
Chapter 2
10
Chapter 3
17
Chapter 4
24
Chapter 5
31
Chapter 6
38
Chapter 7
43
Chapter 8
50
Chapter 26
175
Chapter 27
179
Chapter 28
185
BOOK FOURTH
191
Chapter 30
197
Chapter 31
202
Chapter 32
207
Chapter 33
213

Chapter 9
56
Chapter 10
62
Chapter 11
67
BOOK SECOND
74
Chapter 13
82
Chapter 14
91
Chapter 15
97
Chapter 16
107
Chapter 17
114
Chapter 18
121
Chapter 20
128
Chapter 21
135
BOOK THIRD
146
Chapter 23
155
Chapter 24
162
Chapter 34
219
Chapter 35
224
Chapter 36
231
Chapter 37
237
BOOK FIFTH
244
Chapter 39
254
Chapter 40
264
Chapter 41
273
Chapter 42
282
BOOK SIXTH
286
Chapter 44
291
Chapter 45
299
Chapter 46
305
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Henry James, American novelist and literary critic, was born in 1843 in New York City. Psychologist-philosopher William James was his brother. By the age of 18, he had lived in France, England, Switzerland, Germany, and New England. In 1876, he moved to London, having decided to live abroad permanently. James was a prolific writer; his writings include 22 novels, 113 tales, 15 plays, approximately 10 books of criticism, and 7 travel books. His best-known works include Daisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The American Scene. His works of fiction are elegant and articulate looks at Victorian society; while primarily set in genteel society, James subtlely explores class issues, sexual repression, and psychological distress. Henry James died in 1916 in London. The James Memorial Stone in Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, commemorates him.

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