The public and domestic life of His late ... Majesty, George the Third: comprising the most eventful and important period in the annals of British history, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Printed for Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1820 - Great Britain
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Page 51 - It is very meet, right, and our bounden duty, that we should at all times, and in all places, give thanks unto Thee, O Lord [' Holy Father], Almighty, Everlasting God.
Page 55 - Whom all holy desires, all good counsels, and all just works do proceed; Give unto Thy servants that peace which the world cannot give; that both our hearts may be set to obey Thy commandments, and also that by Thee we being defended from the fear of our enemies may pass our time in rest and quietness; through the merits of Jesus Christ our Saviour.
Page 197 - The question with me is, not whether you have a right to render your people miserable, but whether it is not your interest to make them happy. It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what humanity, reason and justice tell me I ought to do.
Page 227 - In God's name, if it is absolutely necessary to declare either for peace or war, and the former cannot be preserved with honour, why is not the latter commenced without hesitation? I am not, I confess, well informed of the resources of this kingdom ; but I trust it has still sufficient to maintain its just rights, though I know them not. But, my Lords, any state is better than despair. Let us at least make one effort; and if we must fall, let us fall like men...
Page 49 - Blessed be the LORD thy God, which delighted in thee, to set thee on the throne of Israel: because the LORD loved Israel for ever, therefore made he thee king, to do judgment and justice.
Page 215 - Johnson said, he thought he had already done his part as a writer. " I should have thought so too," said the king, " if you had not written so well.
Page 60 - Kingdom, or that he ought not to enjoy the same, here is his Champion, who saith that he lieth, and is a false traitor ; being ready in person to combat with him, and in this quarrel will adventure his life against him on what day soever he shall be appointed.
Page 209 - ... they said, was a book they always kept by them ; and the King said he had one copy of it at Kew, and another in town, and immediately went and took it down from a shelf. I found it was the second edition. ' I never stole a book but one,' said his Majesty, ' and that was yours (speaking to me); I stole it from the Queen, to give it to Lord Hertford to read.
Page 215 - Oxford. Johnson answered, he could not much commend their diligence, but that in some respects they were mended, for they had put their press under better regulations, and were at that time printing Polybius. He was then asked whether there were better libraries at Oxford or Cambridge. He answered, he believed the Bodleian was larger than any they had at Cambridge ; at the same time adding, " I hope, whether we have more books or not than they have at Cambridge, we shall make as good use of them...
Page 217 - Sir, they may talk of the king as they will ; but he is the finest gentleman I have ever seen." And he afterwards observed to Mr. Langton, " Sir, his manners are those of as fine a gentleman as we may suppose Lewis the fourteenth or Charles the second.

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