The ancestry of Rosalie Morris Johnson: daughter of George Calvert Morris and Elizabeth Kuhn, his wife (Google eBook)

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Printed for private circulation only by Ferris & Leach, 1905
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Page 88 - In prosecutions for the publication of papers, investigating the official conduct of officers, or men in a public capacity, or where the matter published is proper for public information, the truth thereof may be given in evidence ; and, in all indictments for libels, the jury shall have a right to determine the law and the facts, under the direction of the court, as in other cases.
Page 87 - Government ; and no law shall ever be made to restrain the right thereof; the free communication of thoughts and opinions is one of the invaluable rights of man, and every citizen may freely speak, write, and print on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that liberty.
Page 112 - She According to the Custom of Marriage Assuming the Name of her Husband, as a further Confirmation thereof: Did then and there to these Presents Set their Hands, and we whose Names are here under also subscribed, being present, at the Solemnization of the said Marriage and Subscription, have as Witnesses thereunto set our Hands the Day and Year above Written 1754.
Page 90 - ... every man who prefers freedom to a life of slavery will bless and honor you as men who have baffled the attempt of tyranny, and, by an impartial and uncorrupt verdict, have laid a noble foundation for securing to ourselves, our posterity, and our neighbors that to which nature and the laws of our country have given us a right the liberty both of exposing and opposing arbitrary power (in these parts of the world, at least) by speaking and writing truth.
Page 7 - Executrix of this my last will and testament, revoking all other wills by me heretofore made. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal the fifteenth day of the Sixth Month in the Year of our Lord One thousand Seven hundred and Ninety-Two.
Page 81 - We have no Officers but what are necessary; none but what earn their Salaries, and those generally are either elected by the People, or appointed by their Representatives. "Other Provinces swarm with unnecessary Officers, nominated by the Governors, who often make it a main Part of their Care to support those Officers, (notwithstanding their Oppressions). At all events, I hope it will ever be the Wisdom of our Assemblies to create no great Offices or Officers, nor indeed any Officer at all, but what...
Page 90 - Men who injure and oppress the people under their administration provoke them to cry out and complain; and then make that very complaint the foundation for new oppressions and prosecutions.
Page 87 - If it is not Law it is Better than Law, it Ought to be Law and will always be Law wherever Justice prevails.
Page 90 - But to conclude: the question before the court, and you, gentlemen of the jury, is not of small nor private concern; it is not the cause of a poor printer, nor of New York alone, which you are now trying. No! It may in its consequence affect every freeman that lives under a British government on the main of America! It is the best cause. It is the cause of liberty...
Page 90 - British government on the main of America. It is the best cause. It is the cause of liberty ; and I make no doubt but your upright conduct this day will not only entitle you to the love and esteem of your fellow citizens; but every man who prefers freedom to a life of slavery will bless and honor you as men who have baffled the...

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