Diary of the American Revolution, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Charles Scribner, 1859 - United States
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Page 108 - It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down unto the beard, even unto Aaron's beard, and went down to the skirts of his clothing. 3 Like as the dew of Hermon, which fell upon the hill of Sion. 4 For there the Lord promised his blessing, and life for evermore.
Page 314 - The Board having maturely considered these facts, do also report to his Excellency General Washington, that Major Andre, Adjutant General to the British army, ought to be considered as a spy from the enemy, and that agreeably to the law and usage of nations, it is their opinion he ought to suffer death.
Page 36 - to enable his majesty to appoint commissioners, with sufficient powers to treat, consult, and agree upon the means of quieting the disorders now subsisting in certain of the colonies, plantations, and provinces of North America.
Page 43 - The essential and direct end of the present defensive alliance is to maintain effectually the liberty, sovereignty, and independence absolute and unlimited, of the said United States, as well in matters of government as of commerce.
Page 288 - ... genteel address. His features are manly and bold ; his eyes of a bluish cast and very lively ; his hair a deep brown ; his face rather long, and marked with the smallpox ; his complexion sunburnt, and without much color. His countenance sensible, composed, and thoughtful. There is a remarkable air of dignity about him, with a striking degree of gracefulness.
Page 43 - If war should break out between France and Great Britain during the continuance of the present war between the United States and England, His Majesty and the said United States shall make it a common cause and aid each other mutually with their good offices, their counsels and their forces, according to the exigence of conjunctures, as becomes good and faithful allies.
Page 76 - The Minister being seated, he gave his credentials into the hands of his secretary, who advanced and delivered them to the President. The secretary of Congress then read and translated them; which being done, Mr Lee announced the Minister to the President and Congress; at this time, the President, the Congress, and the Minister rose together; he bowed to the President and the Congress, they bowed to him; whereupon, the whole seated themselves.
Page 46 - ... upon a lasting foundation, it becomes us to set apart a day for gratefully acknowledging the divine goodness, and celebrating the important event, which we owe to his divine interposition.
Page 374 - The said States hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defence, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.
Page 392 - ... left of the road, and two others (with a wood of about two hundred yards broad between them) on our right of it. Beyond these fields the wood continued for several miles to our right. The wood beyond the plantation in our front, in the skirt of which the enemy's first line was formed, was about a mile in depth, the road then leading into an extensive space of cleared ground about Guilford Court House.

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