Art and Nationalism in Colonial India, 1850-1922: Occidental Orientations

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Cambridge University Press, 1994 - Art - 475 pages
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An original study of the history of modern Indian art, this book tells the story of Indian art during the Raj, set against the interplay of colonialism and nationalism. The work addresses the tensions and contradictions that attended the advent of European naturalism in India, as part of the imperial design for the westernization of the elite, and traces the artistic evolution from unquestioning westernization to the construction of Hindu national identity. Through a wide range of literary and pictorial sources, Partha Mitter's work balances the study of colonial cultural institutions with the ideologies of the nationalist and intellectual movements that followed.
  

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Contents

Art education and Raj patronage
29
Salon artists and the rise of the Indian public
63
The power of the printed image
120
Raja Ravi Varma
179
Bengali patriots and art for the nation
221
Ideology of swadeshi art
234
How the past was salvaged by swadeshi artists
267
public battle of styles
340
EPILOGUE
375
Bibliography
436
Index
451
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Partha Mitter is Professor of History of Art at the University of Sussex. Currently a Visiting Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, he also lectures around the world, notably Columbia University, Princeton University, and Oxford and Cambridge Universities.

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