Exotic flora: containing figures and descriptions of new, rare or otherwise interesting exotic plants...with remarks upon their generic and specific characters, natural orders, history, culture, time of flowering, &c (Google eBook)

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Printed for W. Blackwood, 1825 - Botany
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Page 68 - Rare, or otherwise interesting Exotic Plants, especially of such as are deserving of being cultivated in our Gardens. 3 vols.
Page 152 - Arracacha, they are of full as universal use as the potatoes are in England. The cultivation of the Arracacha requires a deep black mould, that will easily yield to the descent of its large vertical roots. The mode of propagating it is to cut the root into pieces, each having an eye or shoot, and to plant these in separate holes.
Page 166 - Hollander, who had returned from the Spice Islands, informed Sir WILLIAM TEMPLE, that, at one time, he saw three piles of Nutmegs burnt, each of which was more than a church of ordinary dimensions could hold.
Page 167 - April ; the outer pulpy coat is removed, and afterwards the mace, with a knife. "The nuts are placed over a slow fire, when the shell becomes very brittle, and the seeds, or nutmegs, drop out : these are then soaked in sea-water, and impregnated with lime, a process which answers the double purpose of securing the seeds from the attack of insects, and of destroying their vegetating property. It further prevents the volatilization of the aroma.
Page 167 - April, when the nuts, as well as the mace, are in the greatest perfection, their number being then not so great, and the season being dry. The outer pulpy coat is removed, and afterwards the mace with a knife. The nuts are placed over a slow fire, when the shell becomes very brittle, and the seeds or nutmegs drop out ; these are then soaked in...
Page 152 - The cultivation of this plant requires deep black mould, that will easily yield to the descent of the large Vertical roots. It is propagated by planting pieces of the root, in each of which is an eye or shoot ; these acquire, in three or four months, a size sufficient for culinary purposes ; though, if permitted to continue six months in the ground, they attain to immense dimensions, without any injury to their flavour. The colour of the root is white, yellow, or purple ; but all the varieties have...
Page 152 - ... but throw up a greater number of stems ; or, at best, they will be small and of indifferent flavour. In the countries which are there called temperate, being less hot than those at the foot of the Cordilleras, this vegetable is sometimes found to thrive, but never so well as in the elevated regions of those mountains, where the medium heat is between 58 and 60 deg. of Fahrenheit's scale. Here it is that these roots grow the most luxuriantly, and acquire the most delicious taste.
Page 167 - In the Moluccas, the gathering of the fruit takes place at three periods of the year ; in July and August, when the Nutmegs are most abundant, but the Mace is thinner than in the smaller fruits, which are gathered during November, the second time of collecting : the third harvest takes place in the month of March, or beginning of April, when the Nuts, as well as the Mace, are in the greatest perfection, their number being then not so great, and the season being dry. The outer pulpy coat is removed,...
Page 89 - CENTROCLINIUM * rejlexum; herbaceum ? foliis ovato-lanceolatis grosse dentatis, pedunculis bracteato-setaceis, involucri squamis apice reflexis. DESCR. This appears to be an annual plant from a foot and a half to two feet in height, branched, the branches woolly. Leaves spreading, two to three inches long, ovatolanceolate, acute, coarsely toothed, gradually tapering into a petiole, woolly and white beneath, above cobwebby, but at length nearly glabrous. Peduncles solitary, terminal, or from the axils...
Page 164 - Nutmeg as sold in our shops) which is of an oval or elliptical form, pale brown, quite smooth, when first deprived of its shell, but soon becoming shrivelled, so as to have irregular, vertical lines or furrows on its surface. Its outside very thin ; its inner substance or albumen is firm, but fleshy, whitish, but so traversed with red-brown veins, which abound in oil, as to appear beautifully marbled. Near the base of the albumen, and imbedded in a cavity in its substance, is situated the Embryo,...