Physically Based Rendering: From Theory to Implementation

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Morgan Kaufmann, 2010 - Computers - 1167 pages
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Physically Based Rendering, Second Edition describes both the mathematical theory behind a modern photorealistic rendering system as well as its practical implementation. A method known as "literate programming" combines human-readable documentation and source code into a single reference that is specifically designed to aid comprehension. The result is a stunning achievement in graphics education. Through the ideas and software in this book, you will learn to design and employ a full-featured rendering system for creating stunning imagery.

This new edition greatly refines its best-selling predecessor by streamlining all obsolete code as well as adding sections on parallel rendering and system design; animating transformations; multispectral rendering; realistic lens systems; blue noise and adaptive sampling patterns and reconstruction; measured BRDFs; and instant global illumination, as well as subsurface and multiple-scattering integrators. These updates reflect the current state-of-the-art technology, and along with the lucid pairing of text and code, ensure the book's leading position as a reference text for those working with images, whether it is for film, video, photography, digital design, visualization, or gaming.

The author team of Matt Pharr, Greg Humphreys, and Pat Hanrahan garnered a 2014 Academy Award for Scientific and Technical Achievement from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences based on the knowlege shared in this book.The Academy called the book a "widely adopted practical roadmap for most physically based shading and lighting systems used in film production."



  • The book that won its authors a 2014 Academy Award for Scientific and Technical Achievement from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
  • New sections on subsurface scattering, Metropolis light transport, precomputed light transport, multispectral rendering, and much more
  • Includes a companion site complete with source code for the rendering system described in the book, with support for Windows, OS X, and Linux: visit www.pbrt.org
  • Code and text are tightly woven together through a unique indexing feature that lists each function, variable, and method on the page that they are first described
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Geometry and Transformations
55
Shapes
107
Primitives and Intersection Acceleration
183
Color and Radiometry
261
Camera Models
301
Sampling and Reconstruction
323
Reflection Models
423
Light Transport I Surface Reflection
739
Light Transport II Volume Rendering
873
Light Transport III Precomputed Light Transport
925
Retrospective and the Future
989
Utilities
999
Scene Description Interface
1045
Index of Fragments
1077
Index of Classes and their Members
1091

Materials
477
Texture
501
Volume Scattering
575
Light Sources
605
Monte Carlo Integration I Basic Concepts
637
Monte Carlo Integration II Improving Efficiency
679
Index of Miscellaneous Identifiers
1101
References
1105
Index
1143
From Theory to Implementation
1169
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Matt Pharr is works as an engineer for Neoptica, a San Francisco start-up, where he works on interactive graphics. Previously, he was a member of the technical staff at NVIDIA and was a co-founder of Exluna, where he developed off-line rendering software and investigated applications of graphics hardware to high-quality rendering. He holds a BS degree from Yale University and a PhD from the Stanford Graphics Laboratory under the supervision of Pat Hanrahan, where he researched both theoretical and systems issues related to rendering and has written a series of SIGGRAPH papers on these topics.

Greg Humphreys is an assistant professor of Computer Science at the University of Virginia, where his research focuses on interactive visualization of very large datasets. Greg has a B.S. degree from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University under the supervision of Pat Hanrahan. His doctoral dissertation "A Stream Processing Approach to Interactive Graphics on Clusters of Workstations" showed that it was possible to build scalable interactive graphics systems using only commodity components. His cluster rendering software called "Chromium" is in widespread use in research and industry labs around the world.

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