The American First Class Book, Or, Exercises in Reading and Recitation: Selected Principally from Modern Authors of Great Britain and America, and Designed for the Use of the Highest Class in Publick and Private Schools (Google eBook)

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Carter, Hendee & Company, 1832 - Readers - 480 pages
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Contents

Eternity of God Greenwood
39
The same concluded Ibid
41
Inscription for the Entrance into a Wood Bryant
53
A Summer Morning Thomson
66
Importance of literaturea DialogueCadmus
68
On the pleasure of acquiring Knowledge Mison
72
On the Uses of Knowledge Ibid
73
2i The Planetary System Mangnall
81
PIECES FOR RECITATION OR SPEAKING
86
The mutual relation between Sleep and Night Paley
109
Social Worship agreeable to the best impulses of our nature Mrs Barbavld
110
On the relative value of good Sense and Beauty in the Female Sex Lond Lit Gazette 116 51 The Miseries of War Robert Hall
124
Nature and Poetry favourable to Virtue Humility recommended in judging of Providence Beattie
127
Consideration of the excuses that are offered to palliate a neglect of religion Bockminster
129
Subject continued Ibid
131
Subject concluded Ibid
134
PIECES FOR RECITATION OR SPEAKING
137
G9 The American Rcpublick Byron
164
Maternal Affection Scrap Book 140 62 The Seasons Monthly Anthology 144 71 Autumn Mison
166
The Grave Stones James Gray
178
Slavery Coicper
181
The same subject Montgomery
182
The Slave Trade Webster
183
Song of Rebecca the Jewess Ivanhoe
186
On the reasonableness of Christian Faith Bcckminster
187
On the importance of Christian Faith Ibid
190
All things are of God Moore
194
Sonnet written in a Churchyard Blackwood s Mag
196
New mode of Fishing Scrap Book 142 109 Diedrich Knickerbockers NewEngland
199
The Dungeon Lyrical Ballads
207
To the Rosemary H K White
208
Covenanters Grahamc
209
Death and Character of Howard Clarke 225 100 The Monied Man Jfew Montldy Mag
228
Toe Highlander W Gillespie
230
Daily Prayer Morning Channing
234
Daily Prayer Evening Ibid
237
Baneful influence of skeptical philosophy Campbell
240
On the Dangers of Moral Sentiment unaccompanied with Active Virtue Mison
246
On Infidelity A Thompson
249
The same subject concluded Ibid
250
The Young Minstrel Beattie
275
Ossians Address to the Sun Ossian
281
On the Use and Abuse of Amusements Mison
287
Forest Trees W Irving
295
Old Mortality Tales of My Landlord
298
The Discontented Pendulum Jane Taylor
314
A belief in the Superintendence of Providence the only adequate Support under Affliction Wordsworth
317
Apostrophe to the Ocean Byron 286 144 The Greek Emigrants Song 3 G Percital
322
Letter from the British Spy in Virginia Wirt
324
Thanksgiving Crafts
329
WowEngland Id
330
its
333
An Evening in the Graveyard American Watciikah
335
Burial places near Constantinople Jlnastisiiis
337
Destruction of Goldauand other villages Bickminstilk
345
Affecting picture of Constancy in Love Crabbc 242
351
Lycidasa monody Milton
353
The Waterfall from the Russian Anthology Derzhavin
366
The Aldermans Funeral Southty 308
370
The Churchyard first and second voices Koramsm
377
The Rich man and the Poor man Ibid Khemnitzer
378
The Abuses of Conscience a sermon Sterne
379
liiue of Alaric the Visigoth E Everett
388
Character of John Play fair t Jeffrey
391
The American Eagle Neal
398
Lochiels Warning Campbell
406
Extract from a dialogue between a satirick poet and Us friend ?K
410
Prince Edward and his keeper Miss Raiuie A J 182 Arthur Hubert and attendants Shakspeare
418
Battle Hymn of the Berlin Landsurm Earner
427
Extract from Heaven and Eartha Mystery Byron
428
Hamlet and Horatio Shakspeare
431
Extract from the Essay on Criticism Pope
433
Gil Bias and the Archbishop from Le Sage
436
Alexander tho Great and a Robber Dr Aikin
438
Lines on the entry of the Austrians mto Naples Moore
440
Soliloquy of Macbeth Shakspeare
441
Malcolm Macduff and Rosse JIM
442
Description of the Castle of Indolence and its
460
sw tie o Indolence Thomson
464
Religion ani Superstition contrasted Mrs Carter 362 209 On the moral uses of the phenomena of the material universe Alison
472

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Page 441 - a dagger, which I see before me, The handle toward my hand ? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not; and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling, as to sight ? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain 1
Page 376 - gether, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living. And, when he had spent all, there arose a mighty famine in that land; and lie began to be in want. And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country ; and he sent him into his
Page 356 - he be beneath the watery floor ; So sinks the day-star in the ocean bed, And yet anon repairs his drooping head, And tricks his beams, and, with new-spangled ore, Flames in the forehead of the morning sky : So Lycidas sunk low, but mounted high, Through the dear might of him that walked the waves; Where other groves
Page 455 - t Yet Brutus says he was ambitious ; And sure, he is an honourable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke; But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause: What cause withholds you then to mourn for him 1 O
Page 354 - your old bards, the famous Druids, lie, Nor on the shaggy top of Mona high, Nor yet where Deva spreads her wizard stream: Ay me ! I fondly dream ! But, O the heavy change ! now thou art gone ! Now thou art gone, and never must return ! Thee, shepherd, thee the woods, and desert caves With wild
Page 354 - His gory visage down the stream was sent, Down the swift Hebrus to the Lesbian shore t Alas ! what boots it with incessant care To tend the homely, slighted, shepherd's trade, And strictly meditate the thankless Muse ? "Were it not better done, as others use, To sport with Amaryllis in the shade, Or with
Page 255 - Seek'st thou the plashy brink Of weedy lake, or marge of river wide, Or where the rocking billows rise and sink On the chafed ocean-side ? There is a Power whose care Teaches thy way along that pathless coast, The desert and illimitable air, Lone wandering, but not lost.
Page 27 - The quality of mercy is not strain'd ; It droppeth as the gentle dew from Heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest; It blesseth him that gives and him that takes ; 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest. It becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; And earthly
Page 181 - Receive our air, that moment they are free , They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then, And let it circulate through every vein Of all your empire; that, where Britain's power Is felt, mankind may feel her mercy too. LESSON
Page 257 - Old ocean's gray and melancholy waste, Are but the solemn decorations all Of the great tomb of man. The golden sun, The planets, all the infinite host of heaven, Arc shining on the sad abodes of death, Through the still lapse of ages. All that tread The globe are but a handful to the tribes That slumber in its

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