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Books Books 1 - 6 of 6 on British wire-gauge (0'238 inch diameter), carried round the foundation of the house,....
" British wire-gauge (0'238 inch diameter), carried round the foundation of the house, up each of the corners and gables, and along the ridges. The copper wire may be built into the wall to prevent theft ; and it should be connected to any outside metal,... "
The Applications of Physical Forces - Page 542
by Amédée Guillemin - 1877 - 741 pages
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The Journal of Science, and Annals of Astronomy, Biology, Geology ..., Volume 13

James Samuelson, William Crookes - Science - 1876
...this was superfluous in this climate. For ordinary buildings it would suffice to have a copper wire carried round the foundation of the house, up each of the corners and gables, and along the ridges. The copper wires might be built into the walls to prevent theft. In the case of a powder-mill, it might...
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The Meteorological Magazine, Volumes 11-12

Meteorology - 1876
...of good conducting substance. For instance, if a copper rod were carried round the foundations of a house, up each of the corners and gables, and along the ridges, that would be a sufficient protection for an ordinary building against any thunderstorm in this climate...
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Annual Record of Science and Industry, Volume 7

Spencer Fullerton Baird - Industrial arts - 1878
...thunder-storm outside. Ordinarily, however, it would be quite sufficient to carry a No. 4 copper wire round the foundation of the house, up each of the corners and gables and along the ridges. If there are no metallic connections with distant points, such as water and gas pipes, it is not necessary...
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The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science

Science - 1889
...building with a network, say, of copper wire, such as No. 4 British wire-gauge (O238 inch diameter), carried round the foundation of the house, up each of the corners and gables, and along the ridges. The copper wire may be built into the wall to prevent theft ; and it should be connected to any outside...
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Philosophical Magazine

Physics - 1889
...building with a network, say, of copper wire, such as No. 4 British wire-gauge (0238 inch diameter), carried round the foundation of the house, up each of the corners and gables, and along the ridges. The copper wire may be built into the wall to prevent theft ; and it should be connected to any outside...
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Philosophical Magazine

Science - 1889
...building with a network, say, of copper wire, such as No. 4 British wire-gauge (0'238 inch diameter), carried round the foundation of the house, up each of the corners and gables, and along the ridges. The copper wire may be built into the wall to prevent theft ; and it should be connected to any outside...
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