Pittsburgh and the Appalachians: Cultural and Natural Resources in a Postindustrial Age (Google eBook)

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Joseph L. Scarpaci, Kevin Joseph Patrick
University of Pittsburgh Pre, 2006 - Social Science - 264 pages
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Few American cities reflect the challenges and promise of a twenty-first-century economy better than Pittsburgh and its surrounding region. Once a titan of the industrial age, Pittsburgh flourished from the benefits of its waterways, central location, and natural resources-bituminous coal to fire steel furnaces; salt and sand for glass making; gas, oil, and just enough ore to spark an early iron industry. Today, like many cities located in the manufacturing triangle that stretches from Boston to Duluth to St. Louis, Pittsburgh has made the transition to a service-based economy.

Pittsburgh and the Appalachians presents a collection of eighteen essays that explore the advantages and disadvantages that Pittsburgh and its surrounding region face in the new global economy, from the perspectives of technology, natural resources, workforce, and geography.  It offers an extensive examination of the processes and factors that have transformed much of industrial America during the past half-century, and shows how other cities can learn from the steps Pittsburgh has taken through redevelopment, green space acquisition, air and water quality improvement, cultural revival, and public-private partnerships to create a more livable, economically viable region for future populations.

  

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Contents

Downtown Pittsburgh RENAISSANCE AND RENEWAL
7
Pittsburgh as a Concentric Triangle
21
The Steel Valley
36
CITY OF SPECIAL PLACES
49
Joe Magarac and the Spirit of Pittsburgh
53
Pittsburghs Strip District FROM INDUSTRY AND WAREHOUSING TO ETHNIC CHIC
64
Pittsburgh City of Bridges
81
Chatham Village THE ENDURING LEGACY OF COLLABORATIVE GENIUS
100
APPALACHIAN CULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCES
151
The Decline of Space and the Ascent of Place INTERNET TECHNOLOGY IN APPALACHIA
155
Appalachia RICH IN NATURAL RESOURCES POOR IN HUMAN OPPORTUNITY
167
Living on the Fringe A GEOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF APPALACHIAN OHIO
178
Central Appalachia s Whitewater Recreation Industry
191
Going to the Mountains DEER HUNTERS IN THE ALLEGHENY NATIONAL FOREST REGION
203
American Heritage Rivers A NEW MODEL FOR WATERSHED PLANNING IN APPALACHIA
220
QUO VADIS?
233

A Communitys Struggle LITTLE ALLEGHENY WEST TAKES ON THE PROS
109
PITTSBURGHS SUBURBS AND BEYOND
123
Pittsburghs Suburbs HOLLOWING OUT THE CORE
125
Factory Outlet Malls PRIME OUTLETS AT GROVE CITY
141
Pittsburgh and the Creative Age
235
What Will the New Millennium Bring?
249
INDEX
255
Copyright

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Page 29 - In the zone of deterioration encircling the central business section are always to be found the so-called 'slums' and 'bad lands,' with their submerged regions of poverty, degradation, and disease, and their underworlds of crime and vice. Within a deteriorating area are rooming-house districts, the purgatory of 'lost souls.
Page 30 - residential area' of high-class apartment buildings or of exclusive 'restricted' districts of single family dwellings. Still farther, out beyond the city limits, is the commuters...

About the author (2006)

Joseph L. Scarpaci is professor of geography at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and author of Barrios and Plazas: Heritage Tourism and Globalization in the Spanish Amiercan Centro Histórico.

Kevin J. Patrick is associate professor of geography and planning at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

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