Virginia and Virginians; Eminent Virginians History of Virginia from Settlement of Jamestown to Close of the Civil War

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General Books LLC, 2009 - 328 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1888. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... The new president, a man of elender constitution and now almost three score and ten years of age, entered upon his presidential duties after this exciting campaign, only to fall a victim to an illness which in eight days from its first appearance culminated in hia death just one month from the day on which he took the oath of office. JOHN TYLER, Tenth President of the United States, was born March 29, 1790, and died January 17, 1862, in his 72d year. He was born in Charles City county, Virginia, the second son of John Tyler, a patriot of the Revolution, and governor of Virginia, 1808-11. John Tyler, sr., was also made a judge of admiralty for Virginia, and wa holding that office at the time of his death, in 1813. His wife, the mothei of the subject of this sketch, was Mary, only child of Robert' Armstead, whose ancestors emigrated to Virginia from Hesse-Darmstadt, in early colonial days. John Tyler received a collegiate and legal training, being graduated from William and Mary College in 1807, and admitted to the bar in 1809. He was never in active practice of his profession, entering public life in 1811, when he was elected to the State legislature. He served five years in the legislature, or until his election, in 1816, to fill a vacancy in Congress. To this position he was twice re-elected. In the House he was a member of what was becoming known as the Southern party. He voted in favor of the resolutions of censure on Jackson's conduct in the Seminole war; and his negative vote is recorded against internal improvements; against United States banks; against a protective Ixilicy; and he strongly opposed and voted against any restriction on the extension of slavery into the territories. In 1819 he resigned, on account of ill health. 1823-5, he was...

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