Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World

Front Cover
Penguin, Jul 9, 2009 - 272 pages
1 Review
One of the most respected behavioral economists in the world and coauthor of the "best economics blog in the universe"* offers an essential guide to success in a radically new hyper-networked age. How will we live well in a super-networked, information-soaked, yet predictably irrational world? The only way to know is to understand how the way we think is changing.As economist Tyler Cowen boldly shows in Create Your Own Economy, the way we think now is changing more rapidly than it has in a very long time. Not since the Industrial Revolution has a man-made creation-in this case, the World Wide Web-so greatly influenced the way our minds work and our human potential. Cowen argues brilliantly that we are breaking down cultural information into ever-smaller tidbits, ordering and reordering them in our minds (and our computers) to meet our own specific needs. Create Your Own Economy explains why the coming world of Web 3.0 is good for us; why social networking sites such as Facebook are so necessary; what's so great about "Tweeting" and texting; how education will get better; and why politics, literature, and philosophy will become richer. This is a revolutionary guide to life in the new world.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE STORIES ARE TOO SIMPLE
STORIES END UP SERVING DUAL AND CONFLICTING FUNCTIONS
MARKETS DONT ALWAYS SEND US THE RIGHT STORIES OR REINFORCE THE RIGHT STORIES
THE FUTURE OF THINKING DIFFERENTLY
HIDDEN CREATIVITY
WHY MODERN CULTURE IS LIKE MARRIAGE IN ALL ITS GLORY
IM CELL PHONES AND FACEBOOK
THE BUDDHA AS SAVIOR AND THE PROFESSOR AS SHAMAN
THE NEW ECONOMY OF STORIES
HEROES
BEAUTY ISNT WHAT YOU THINK
AUTISTIC POLITICS
THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSE
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Tyler Cowen is professor of economics at George Mason University. His books include "Creative Destruction" (Princeton) and "Create Your Own Economy." He frequently writes for the "New York Times," Slate, and the economics blog Marginal Revolution.

Bibliographic information