Journal of the Michigan Schoolmasters' Club, Volume 22; Volumes 31-40 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1894 - Education
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Page 87 - A cos 6 = cos a cos c + sin a sin c cos B cos c = cos a cos 6 + sin a sin 6 cos C Law of Cosines for Angles cos A = cos B...
Page 61 - To prepare us for complete living is the function which education has to discharge ; and the only rational mode of judging of any educational course is, to judge in what degree it discharges such function.
Page 84 - If a straight line meet two straight lines, so as to make the two interior angles on the same side of it taken together less than two right angles...
Page 7 - In determining what is a reasonable punishment various considerations must be regarded ; the nature of the offense, the apparent motive and disposition of the offender, the influence of his example and conduct upon others, and the sex, age, size and strength of the pupil to be punished. Among reasonable persons, much difference prevails as to the circumstances which will justify the infliction ot punishment and the extent to which it may properly be administered.
Page 47 - Hypothesis if two adjacent angles have their exterior sides in the same straight line, then Conclusion the sum of these adjacent angles is equal to two right angles.
Page 51 - In any triangle, the square of the side opposite an acute angle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides, minus twice the product of one of these sides and the projection of the other side upon it.
Page 19 - Euclid honourably shelved or buried "deeper than did ever plummet sound" out of the schoolboy's reach, morphology introduced into the elements of Algebra projection, correlation, and motion accepted as aids to geometry the mind of the student quickened and elevated and his faith awakened by early initiation into the ruling ideas of polarity, continuity, infinity, and familiarization with the doctrine of the imaginary and inconceivable.
Page 7 - Hence the teacher is not to be held liable on the ground of excess of punishment, unless the punishment is clearly excessive and would be held so in the general judgment of reasonable men. If the punishment be thus clearly excessive, then the master...
Page 61 - ... same extent to every pupil so long as he pursues it, no matter what the probable destination of the pupil may be, or at what point his education is to cease. Thus, for all pupils who study Latin, or history, or algebra, for example, the allotment of time and the method of instruction in a given school should be the same year by year. Not that all the pupils should pursue every subject for the same number of years; but so long as they do pursue it, they should all be treated alike.
Page 61 - ... every subject which is taught at all in a secondary school should be taught in the same way and to the same extent to every pupil so long as he pursues it, no matter what the probable destination of the pupil may be, or at what point his education is to cease.

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