On the injuries and diseases of bones (Google eBook)

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Sydenham Society, 1847 - 459 pages
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Page 167 - Leeches, poultices and fomentations were applied, and followed by some alleviation of the local symptoms, though there was much constitutional disturbance. At the close of a fortnight from the accident, the palmar surface of the fore-arm presented a point where fluctuation was supposed to exist ; but when a bistoury was plunged into it no matter followed. Portions of the flexor muscles subsequently sloughed, and the skin subsequently mortified. The only resource was amputation, which was performed...
Page 364 - In continuation he observed that on making comparison of the neck vertebra^ of the box tortoise with those of the great fossil armadilloes of South America, some remarkable and instructive similarities were noticed. Especially was this the case in regard to the hinge-like joint between the last vertebra of the neck and the first of the body. It indicated similarity of function, and was undoubtedly used by the armadillo to partially withdraw the head within the carapace as in the box tortoise, or...
Page 187 - THERE is a species of displacement of the upper extremity of the femur, of which I have not found any mention in authors, although I have carefully sought for it: and in directing attention to this subject, I have been prompted by a desire to guard practitioners against a serious error in diagnosis and treatment, rather than by the melancholy satisfaction of adding one more item to the already too extended catalogue of human infirmities. This displacement consists in a transposition of the head of...
Page 367 - ... the same spot. The anterior spinal muscles, the vertebral arteries and phrenic nerves were uninjured. The spinal cord was flattened, compressed, and softened. It appears, then, that these dislocations may occur; and the symptoms which attend the accident in the cervical region are nearly uniform, the cause of death being, apparently, the upward extension of the disorganization of the spinal cord, so that the origin of the phrenic nerves is ultimately involved, and death takes place from asphyxia.
Page 41 - nature never accomplished the immediate union of a fracture save by the formation of two successive deposits of callus...
Page 348 - Dislocation of all the metatarsal bones on the corresponding bones of the tarsus. Franchise Voichot, aged 30, of excellent constitution, was brought to the Hotel-Dieu in 1822. She stated that, in descending from the bridge of St. Michel with a burden of two hundred- weight, she fell in such a way that the whole weight of the body was received on the right foot ; and that at the moment she made an effort to check herself in falling, she experienced extremely severe pain in this part, and heard...
Page 190 - ... though the head of the femur was luxated during the life of the patient. Baron Dupuytren, on the Injuries and Diseases of the Bones, under the head of Congenital Dislocation, observes : " Whatever importance may be attached to this dislocation in the abstract, it is deserving of still more attention on account of its presenting all the signs of luxation consequent on disease of the hip-joint, with which it has always been confounded.
Page 166 - ... deserving of attentive consideration on account of the serious complications which accompanied them, and which were the consequence of forgetting an important precept. More than once, indeed, it has occurred, that the surgeons have been so intent on preserving fractures in their proper position, that the extreme constriction employed has actually caused destruction of the soft parts.
Page 366 - To the left of this depression was another prominence, which, it was presumed, was produced by the transverse processes of these last-named vertebrae. There was at this time entire paralysis of the lower part of the body, and the respiration was purely phrenic. This patient died quietly ten hours after the accident. When the body was examined, a dislocation of the fifth from the sixth cervical vertebra was found, the former being forced forwards; yet the bodies of neither were broken. The intervening...
Page 99 - The treatment consisted in placing the arm, semiflexed, on a pillow between it and the trunk ; the pillow being arranged so as to form a pyramid, the summit of which was lodged in the axilla : the upper part of the limb was covered with a moistened compress, and the elbow-joint fixed by fastening a bandage around it and across the bed, by which arrangement the shaft of the bone was likewise prevented from being carried upwards and inwards. In ten days the swelling had entirely subsided ; and on the...

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