Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 350 pages
20 Reviews
Drawing on seven years of his own research and the work of other esteemed Lincoln scholars, Shenk reveals how the 16th president harnessed his depression to fuel his astonishing success.
  

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Review: Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

User Review  - Richard - Goodreads

Great book. I think it's changed my life. To see that someone as great as Abraham Lincoln suffered through depression is encouraging. I also wonder what hope there is for the rest of us. Does ... Read full review

Review: Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

User Review  - John - Goodreads

I will note at the beginning that I am very glad that someone has written a book that treats this subject as thoroughly as Shenk has treated it. It seems likely that Shenk has established depression ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
PART ONE
9
The Community Said He Was Crazy
11
A Fearful Gift
26
I Am Now the Most Miserable Man Living
43
PART TWO
67
A SelfMade Man
69
A Misfortune Not a Fault
81
Its Precise Shape and Color
126
The Fiery Trial Through Which We Pass
159
Comes Wisdom to Us
191
Epilogue
211
What Everybody Knows
221
Notes
244
Bibliography
300
Acknowledgments
323

The Reign of Reason
97
The Vents of My Moods and Gloom
112
PART THREE
126

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About the author (2006)

JOSHUA WOLF SHENK is an essayist and independent scholar whose work has appeared in numerous magazines and in the national bestseller Unholy Ghost: Writers on Depression. He has written for The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, the Atlantic Monthly, the New York Times, Mother Jones, and other publications. He has been a correspondent for the New Republic, the Economist, and U.S. News & World Report. A contributing editor to the Washington Monthly and a faculty member at New School University, Shenk serves on the advisory council of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and consulted on the History Channel's film Lincoln. He lives in Brooklyn.

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