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Books Books 1 - 10 of 165 on The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious to....  
" The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious to the intellect, and more probably to the moral character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature. "
Library of the world's best literature, ancient and modern - Page 4402
edited by - 1897
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The Medical Bulletin: A Monthly Journal of Medicine and Surgery, Volume 27

Medicine - 1905
...the greatest authority on degeneration : "If I had my life to live over again I wojld have made the rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week." If at first a feeling of discouragement or a sentiment of forthcoming failure arises, be assured...
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Education, Volume 42

Education - 1922
...for the fine arts. Darwin adds that if he had had his life to live over again, he would have made it a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week, "For," he says, "perhaps the part of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept alive through use."...
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Education, Volume 39

Education - 1919
...on which the higher tastes depend I cannot conceive. If I had to live my life again I would make it a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week, for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would have been kept alive through use." Every...
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The Congregational Review, Volume 2, Part 1

Religion - 1887
...constituted than mine would not, I suppose, have thus suffered : and if I had to live my life over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week, for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept active through use....
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The Musical World, Volume 68

Music - 1888
...seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts. . . If I had to live my life again, I would have made...and listen to some music at least once every week. The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious to the intellect, and...
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The Popular Science Monthly, Volume 33

Science - 1888
...atrophy of that part of the brain alone on which the higher tastes depend, I can not conceive. ... If I had to live my life again, I •would have made...some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week ; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept active through use....
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The Popular Science Monthly, Volume 33

Technology - 1888
...life again, I •would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week ; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept active through use.f ... It is an accursed evil to a man [he writes to Hooker in 1858] to become so absorbed in any...
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The Unitarian, Volume 4

Jabez Thomas Sunderland, Brooke Herford, Frederick B. Mott - Liberalism (Religion) - 1889
...mind more highly organized or better constituted than mine, would not, I suppose, have thus suffered, and if I had to live my life again, I would have made a rule toread some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week, for perhaps the parts of my brain...
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The Presbyterian Quarterly: 1889, Volume 3

Presbyterianism - 1889
...Darwin writes: "If I had to live my life over again, I would have made it a rule to read some poetry or listen to some music at least once every week; for perhaps the part of my brain now atrophied would then have been kept active through use. The loss of these tastes...
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Natural Religion: From the "Apologie Des Christenthums" of Franz Hettinger ...

Franz Hettinger - Apologetics - 1890 - 302 pages
...astounded." The faith of Copernicus is seen in the humble prayer which he had placed on his tomb:— I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least every week, for perhaps the part of my brain now atrophied would have been kept alive through use....
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